Etymology
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vascular (adj.)
1670s, in anatomy, "pertaining to conveyance or circulation of fluids," from Modern Latin vascularis "of or pertaining to vessels or tubes," from Latin vasculum "a small vessel," diminutive of vas "vessel."
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non-vascular (adj.)

also nonvascular, "lacking vessels for the circulation of fluid," 1815, from non- + vascular.

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cerebrovascular (adj.)
1935, from cerebro-, combining form of Latin cerebrum (see cerebral) + vascular.
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vasculature (n.)
1934, from Latin vascularis (see vascular) on model of musculature.
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cardiovascular (adj.)
also cardio-vascular, "pertaining to both the heart and the blood vessels," 1870, from cardio- + vascular. Cardiovascular system is recorded by 1918.
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rete (n.)

late 14c., "open-work metal plate affixed to an astrolabe," from Latin rete "net," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Lithuanian rėtis "sieve," or perhaps a loan-word from a non-IE language. The main modern sense is anatomical, "vascular network, plexus of blood vessels" (1540s). Plural is retia. Related: Retial.

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phloem (n.)

in botany, "cells and fibers forming the softer, bast portion of a vascular bundle," 1870, from German phloëm (1858), coined by German botanist Karl Wilhelm von Nägeli from Greek phloos, phloios "bark of trees, rind, skin of a fruit," a word of uncertain origin (perhaps from an extended form of PIE root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell"), + passive suffix -ema.

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