Etymology
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vary (v.)
mid-14c. (transitive); late 14c. (intransitive), from Old French variier "be changed, go astray; change, alter, transform" and directly from Latin variare "change, alter, make different," from varius "varied, different, spotted;" perhaps related to varus "bent, crooked, knock-kneed," and varix "varicose vein," and, more distantly, to Old English wearte "wart," Swedish varbulde "pus swelling," Latin verruca "wart." Related: Varied; varying.
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variform (adj.)
1660s, from Latin varius (see vary) + forma "form, shape" (see form (n.)).
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unvarying (adj.)
1680s, from un- (1) "not" + present participle of vary (v.).
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varied (adj.)
"changed," early 15c., past-participle adjective from vary (v.). From 1580s as "differing from one another;" as "characterized by variety," from 1732.
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varify (v.)
"to make varied," c. 1600, from Latin vari-, stem of varius "different, diverse" (see vary) + -fy. Related: Varified; varifying.
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variola (n.)
"smallpox," 1771, medical Latin diminutive of Latin varius "changing, various," in this case "speckled, spotted" (see vary).
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various (adj.)

early 15c., "characterized by variety," from Latin varius "changing, different, diverse" (see vary). Meaning "different from one another, having a diversity of features" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Variously.

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variate (n.)
in statistics, 1899, from adjective variate (mid-15c.), from Latin variatus, past participle of variare (see vary).
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varicolored (adj.)
"diversified in color, motley," also vari-colored, 1660s, from Latin varius (see vary) + English colored (adj.).
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variant (adj.)
late 14c., "tending to change," from Old French variant and directly from Latin variantem (nominative varians), present participle of variare "to change" (see vary).
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