Etymology
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various (adj.)

early 15c., "characterized by variety," from Latin varius "changing, different, diverse" (see vary). Meaning "different from one another, having a diversity of features" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Variously.

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yow 
exclamation, with various meanings, mid-15c.
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mould 

chiefly British English spelling of mold (q.v.) in various senses. Related: Moulded; moulding.

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stand-pipe (n.)
"upright pipe," in various technical senses, 1810, from stand (v.) + pipe (n.).
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pluripotential (adj.)

"capable of developing in any of various directions," 1925, from pluri- + potential. Related: Pluripotent; pluripotency.

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sundry (adj.)
Old English syndrig "separate, apart, special, various, distinct, characteristic," from sundor "separately, apart, asunder" (see sunder) + -y (2). Compare Old High German suntaric, Swedish söndrig "broken, tattered." Meaning "several" is from 1375. As a noun, from mid-13c. with the sense "various ones." Phrase all and sundry is from late 14c.
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heal-all (n.)

1570s, "universal remedy," from heal + all; applied since 1814 to various plants supposed to possess healing virtues. The native word for panacea. For the formation, compare save-all "means of preventing loss or waste" (by 1640s), at first general, used over time of various contrivances.

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devil-fish (n.)

a term used of various large and uncanny marine animals, by 1814, from devil (n.) + fish (n.).

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materialist (n.)
1660s and after in various philosophical and theological senses, on model of French matérialiste, from material (n.) + -ist. Also see materialism.
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milkweed (n.)
1590s, from milk (n.) + weed (n.); used in reference to various plants whose juice resembles milk.
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