Etymology
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variety (n.)

1530s, "change of fortunes," from French variété and directly from Latin varietatem (nominative varietas) "difference, diversity; a kind, variety, species, sort," from varius "various" (see vary). Meaning diversity, absence of monotony" is from 1540s; that of "collection of different things" is from 1550s; sense of "something different from others" is from 1610s. In reference to music hall or theatrical performances of a mixed nature, first recorded 1868, American English. The U.S. theater and entertainment industry magazine was founded in 1905 by Sime Silverman.

Variety's grammar is barbarous; its style is original and unique and completely independent of any other writing; its phraseology is wild and revolutionary and its diction is the result of miscegenation among shop talk, slang, Broadway colloquialisms, sporting neologisms and impatient short-cutting. [Hugh Kent, "Variety," American Mercury, December 1926] 
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varietal (adj.)
"having the characteristics of a variety," 1849, a biologists' word, from variety + -al (1). In reference to wines, "made from a single variety of grape," first attested 1941, American English. As a noun, in this sense, attested from 1955. Related: Varietally.
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cultivar (n.)

"a variety produced in cultivation," 1923, a contraction of cultivated variety; coined by U.S. horticulturalist Liberty Hyde Bailey (1858-1954) in "Gentes Herbarum."

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basmati (n.)
"superior variety of rice," 1845, from Hindi, literally "fragrant."
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diversification (n.)

"act of changing forms or qualities," c. 1600, noun of action from Medieval Latin diversificare "to diversify" (see diversify). Economic sense, in reference to the spread of production over a variety of services or articles, is attested from 1939, later of the spread of investments over a variety of enterprises.

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fave (n.)

1938, perhaps a Variety magazine coinage, slang shortening of favorite (n.). Later also as an adjective.

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sylphid (n.)
younger or smaller variety of sylph, 1670s, from French sylphide (1670s), from sylphe (see sylph) + diminutive suffix.
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oolong (n.)

dark variety of Chinese tea, 1844, from Chinese wu-lung, literally "black dragon."

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fusil (n.)
flintlock musket, 1670s, from French fusil "musket" (see fusilier). Originally in English as distinguished from the matchlock variety.
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Gravenstein 
apple variety, 1802, from Gravenstein, German form of the name of a village and ducal estate (Danish Graasten) in Schleswig-Holstein.
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