Etymology
Advertisement
variant (adj.)
late 14c., "tending to change," from Old French variant and directly from Latin variantem (nominative varians), present participle of variare "to change" (see vary).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
variant (n.)

"something substantially the same, but in different form," 1848, from variant (adj.).

[proof-reader]: Slip 20. Nuri, Emir of the Ruwalla, belongs to the 'chief family of the Rualla.' On Slip 33 'Rualla horse,' and Slip 38, 'killed one Rueili.' In all later slips 'Rualla.'
[author]: Should have also used Ruwala and Ruala.
[from publisher's note to "Revolt in the Desert," T.E. Lawrence, 1927]
Related entries & more 
covariance 

in mathematics, "property of being covariant," 1856, from covariant (1850), from co- + variant.

Related entries & more 
invariant (adj.)

"remaining always the same, not varying or changing," 1795, from in- (1) "not" + variant (adj.). As a noun, in mathematics, from 1851. Related: Invariance.

Related entries & more 
britches (n.)
1905, variant of britch (1620s), an old variant of breech (see breeches).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
yak (v.)
"laugh," 1938, variant of yuck (2); "talk idly," 1950, variant of yack. Related: Yakked; yakking.
Related entries & more