Etymology
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variance (n.)
late 14c., "fact of undergoing change," from Old French variance "change, alteration; doubt, hesitation" and directly from Latin variantia, from stem of variare "to change" (see vary). Meaning "state of disagreement" is recorded from early 15c. The U.S. zoning sense of "official dispensation from a building regulation" is recorded from 1925.
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discordant (adj.)

late 14c., discordaunt, "conflicting in nature or kind, not harmoniously connected or related, at variance, contradictory," from Old French descordant, present participle of descorder and directly from Latin discordare "be at variance, differ, quarrel," from discors "disagreeing, disagreement" (see discord (n.)). Of sounds, "inharmonious, dissonant, disagreeable to the ear," c. 1400. Related: Discordantly.

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unchristian (adj.)
1550s, "not professing Christianity" (of persons), from un- (1) "not" + Christian (adj.). Meaning "at variance with Christian principles" (of actions) is recorded from 1580s.
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peacemaker (n.)

"one who makes peace," as by reconciling parties that are at variance," early 15c., pesmaker; see peace + maker. To make peace "bring about reconciliation" is from c. 1300. Related: Peacemaking.

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unnatural (adj.)
early 15c., "not in accord with physical nature," from un- (1) "not" + natural (adj.). Meaning "artificial" is attested from 1746; that of "at variance with moral standards" is from 1520s. Related: Unnaturally; unnaturalness.
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conflict (v.)

early 15c., "to contend, fight, struggle," from Latin conflictus, past participle of confligere "to strike together, be in conflict," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + fligere "to strike" (see afflict). Meaning "be in opposition, be contrary or at variance" is from 1640s. Related: Conflicted; conflicting.

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discrepancy (n.)

"variance or contrariety, especially of facts or sentiments," mid-15c. (discrepauns, discrepance), from Latin discrepantia "discordance, discrepancy," from discrepantem (nominative discrepans), present participle of discrepare "sound differently, differ," from dis- "apart, off" (see dis-) + crepare "to rattle, crack" (see raven). Modern form is from early 17c. Related: Discrepancies.

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counterculture (n.)

also counter-culture, "way of life or collective values deliberately at variance with the prevailing norms of a time and place," 1968, from counter- + culture (n.). Popularized by, and perhaps coined in, the book "The Making of a Counter Culture" by U.S. academic Theodore Roszak. As an adjective by 1972.

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discord (v.)
Origin and meaning of discord

c. 1300, discorden, "differ in will or opinion, disagree, quarrel," from Old French discorder (13c.) and directly from Latin discordare "be at variance, differ, quarrel," from discors (genitive discordis) "disagreeing, disagreement," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + cor (genitive cordis) "heart," from PIE root *kerd- "heart."

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dissonant (adj.)

early 15c., dissonaunt, "at variance, disagreeing," from Old French dissonant (13c.) and directly from Latin dissonantem (nominative dissonans), present participle of dissonare "differ in sound," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound"). The meaning "discordant in sound, harsh" is from 1570s. Related: Dissonantly.

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