Etymology
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vamoose (v.)

"to decamp, be off," 1834, from Spanish vamos "let us go," from Latin vadamus, first person plural indicative or subjunctive of vadere "to go, to walk, go hastily," from PIE root *wadh- (2) "to go" (source also of Old English wadan "to go," Latin vadum "ford;" see wade (v.)).

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vade 
Latin, imperative singular of vadere "to go" (see vamoose).
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vade-mecum (n.)
"a pocket manual, handbook," 1620s, Latin, literally "go with me;" from imperative of vadere "to go" (see vamoose) + me "me" + cum "with."
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pervade (v.)

"to pass or flow through; to extend or diffuse (itself) throughout," 1650s, from Latin pervadere "spread or go through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + vadere "to go" (see vamoose). Related: Pervaded; pervading; pervasion.

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pervasive (adj.)

tending or having the power to pervade," "1750, with -ive + Latin pervas-, past-participle stem of pervadere "spread or go through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + vadere "to go" (see vamoose). Related: Pervasively; pervasiveness.

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evade (v.)

1510s, "escape," from French evader, from Latin evadere "to escape, get away," from assimilated form of ex "away" (see ex-) + vadere "to go, walk" (see vamoose). Special sense of "escape by trickery" is from 1530s. Related: Evaded; evading.

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mosey (v.)

1829, "move off or away, get out," American English slang, of unknown origin, perhaps related to British dialectal mose about "go around in a dull, stupid way." Or perhaps from some abbreviation of Spanish vamos (see vamoose). Related: Moseyed; moseying.

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invade (v.)
Origin and meaning of invade
"enter in a hostile manner," late 15c., from Latin invadere "to go, come, or get into; enter violently, penetrate into as an enemy, assail, assault, make an attack on," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + vadere "go, walk" (see vamoose). Compare evade. Related: invaded; invading.
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invasive (adj.)

"tending to invade, aggressive," mid-15c., invasif, from Old French invasif (15c.) or directly from Medieval Latin invasivus "invasive," from invas-, past-participle stem of invadere "go into; attack, invade," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + vadere "go, walk" (see vamoose).

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