Etymology
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value (n.)
Origin and meaning of value

c. 1300, "price equal to the intrinsic worth of a thing;" late 14c., "degree to which something is useful or estimable," from Old French value "worth, price, moral worth; standing, reputation" (13c.), noun use of fem. past participle of valoir "be worth," from Latin valere "be strong, be well; be of value, be worth" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). The meaning "social principle" is attested from 1918, supposedly borrowed from the language of painting. Value judgment (1889) is a loan-translation of German Werturteil.

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value (v.)
Origin and meaning of value

mid-15c., "estimate the value of," also "think highly of," probably from value (n.). Related: Valued, valuing.

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theory (n.)

1590s, "conception, mental scheme," from Late Latin theoria (Jerome), from Greek theōria "contemplation, speculation; a looking at, viewing; a sight, show, spectacle, things looked at," from theōrein "to consider, speculate, look at," from theōros "spectator," from thea "a view" (see theater) + horan "to see," which is possibly from PIE root *wer- (3) "to perceive." Philosophy credits sense evolution in the Greek word to Pythagoras.

Earlier in this sense was theorical (n.), late 15c. Sense of "principles or methods of a science or art" (rather than its practice) is first recorded 1610s (as in music theory, which is the science of musical composition, apart from practice or performance). Sense of "an intelligible explanation based on observation and reasoning" is from 1630s.

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added (adj.)

"additional," c. 1600, past-participle adjective from add (v.).

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face-value (n.)

1842, from face (n.) + value (n.). Originally of stock shares, banknotes, etc.

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commodification (n.)

"action of converting (something) into a commercial product or activity," 1968, from commodity + -fication "a making or causing." Originally in Marxist political theory, "the assignment of a market value," often to some quality or thing that the user of the word feels would be better off without it.

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revalue (v.)

"value anew, adjust the value of," 1590s, from re- "again, anew" + value (v.). Related: Revalued; revaluing.

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overvalue (v.)

also over-value, "to value (something) above its true worth," 1590s, from over- + value (v.). Related: Overvalued; overvaluing.

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theorist (n.)

"one given to theory and speculation," 1590s; see theory + -ist.

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undervalue (v.)

1590s, "to rate as inferior in value" (to), from under + value (v.). Sense of "to estimate or esteem too low" is recorded from 1610s. Meaning "to rate at too low a monetary value" is attested from 1620s. Related: Undervalued; undervaluing.

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