Etymology
Advertisement
valley (n.)
c. 1300, from Anglo-French valey, Old French valee "a valley" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *vallata, from Latin vallis "valley," of unknown origin. Valley Girl (in reference to San Fernando Valley of California) was popularized 1982 in song by Frank Zappa and his daughter. Valley of Death (Psalms xxiii.4) was rendered in Middle English as Helldale (mid-13c.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
vale (n.)

river-land between two ranges of hills, early 14c., from Old French val "valley, vale" (12c.), from Latin vallem (nominative vallis, valles) "valley" (see valley). Now "little used except in poetry" [Century Dictionary]. Vale of years "old age" is from "Othello." Vale of tears "this world as a place of trouble" is attested from 1550s. An older phrase in the same sense was dale of dol (mid-15c.).

Related entries & more 
strath (n.)
"wide river valley between hills," 1530s, from Scottish, from Old Irish srath "wide river valley," from Old Celtic *s(t)rato-, from PIE root *stere- "to spread."
Related entries & more 
dale (n.)

level or gently sloping ground between low hills with a stream flowing through it, Old English dæl "vale, valley, gorge," from Proto-Germanic *dalaz "valley" (source also of Old Saxon, Dutch, Gothic dal, Old Norse dalr, Old High German tal, German Tal "valley"), perhaps from PIE *dhel- "a hollow" (source also of Old Church Slavonic dolu "pit," Russian dolu "valley"), or perhaps a substratum word. It was preserved by Norse influence in the north of England. Related: Dalesman.

Related entries & more 
dene (n.1)

"small thickly wooded valley," from Old English denu "valley" (see den). Confused in Middle English with den. In Middle English down and dene meant "hill and dale."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
glen (n.)
"narrow valley," late 15c., from Scottish, from Gaelic gleann "mountain valley" (cognate with Old Irish glenn, Welsh glyn). Common in place names such as Glenlivet (1822), a kind of whiskey, named for the place it was first made (literally "the glen of the Livet," a tributary of the Avon); and Glengarry (1841) a kind of men's cap, of Highland origin, named for a valley in Inverness-shire.
Related entries & more 
Parzival 
also Parsifal, hero of medieval legends, from Old French Perceval, literally "he who breaks through the valley," from percer "to pierce, break through" (see pierce) + val "valley" (see vale).
Related entries & more 
Natchez 

Native American people of the lower Mississippi valley, 1775, a name of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
advisability (n.)
1778 (in a letter from George Washington at Valley Forge), from advisable + -ity. Advisableness is from 1731.
Related entries & more 
beal (n.)
"mouth of a river or valley, opening between hills," 1818 (in Scott), from Gaelic beul "mouth."
Related entries & more