Etymology
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valid (adj.)

1570s, "having force in law, legally binding," from French valide (16c.), from Latin validus "strong, effective, powerful, active," from valere "be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). The meaning "sufficiently supported by facts or authority, well-grounded" is first recorded 1640s.

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validate (v.)
1640s, from Medieval Latin validatus, past participle of validare "to make valid," from validus (see valid). Related: Validated; validating.
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validity (n.)

1540s, from French validité or directly from Late Latin validitatem (nominative validitas) "strength," from Latin validus (see valid).

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*wal- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to be strong."

It forms all or part of: ambivalence; Arnold; avail; bivalent; convalesce; countervail; Donald; equivalent; evaluation; Gerald; Harold; invalid (adj.1) "not strong, infirm;" invalid (adj.2) "of no legal force;" Isold; multivalent; polyvalent; prevalent; prevail; Reynold; Ronald; valediction; valence; Valerie; valetudinarian; valiance; valiant; valid; valor; value; Vladimir; Walter; wield.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin valere "be strong, be well, be worth;" Old Church Slavonic vlasti "to rule over;" Lithuanian valdyti "to have power;" Celtic *walos- "ruler," Old Irish flaith "dominion," Welsh gallu "to be able;" Old English wealdan "to rule," Old High German -walt, -wald "power" (in personal names), Old Norse valdr "ruler."

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intestacy (n.)
"condition of dying without leaving a valid will," 1740, from intestate + -acy.
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admitted (adj.)
1550s, "received," past-participle adjective from admit (v.). As "received as true or valid" from 1780 (implied in admittedly).
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testate (adj.)
"having left a valid will," late 15c., from Latin testatus "public, manifest, published," past participle of testari "make a will, be witness to, declare" (see testament).
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available (adj.)
mid-15c., "beneficial," also "valid, effective, capable of producing the desired effect," from avail + -able. Meaning "at one's disposal, capable of being made use of" is recorded from 1827. Related: Availably.
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remitter (n.)

mid-15c., a legal principle, "restoration of a prior or more valid title to certain property," from Old French remitter, noun use of infinitive, from Latin remittere "send back" (see remit). For legalese noun use of French infinitives, see waiver.

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veritable (adj.)
early 15c., from Anglo-French and Old French veritable "true, real, truthful, valid (in law)," from verité (see verity) + -able. Probably lost mid-17c. and reborrowed or revived after 1830. Related: Veritably.
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