Etymology
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Valerie 
fem. proper name, French, from Latin Valeria, fem. of Valerius, name of a Roman gens, from valere "to be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong").
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valediction (n.)
"a farewell, a bidding farewell," 1610s, from past participle stem of Latin valedicere "bid farewell, take leave," from vale "farewell!," second person singular imperative of valere "be well, be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong") + dicere "to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").
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countervail (v.)

late 14c., countrevaillen, "to be worth as much as," also "to prevail against, resist with equal force," from Anglo-French countrevaloir, Old French contrevaloir "to be effective against, be comparable to," from Latin phrase contra valere "to be worth against" (see contra- and valiant). Related: Countervailing.

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valid (adj.)

1570s, "having force in law, legally binding," from French valide (16c.), from Latin validus "strong, effective, powerful, active," from valere "be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). The meaning "sufficiently supported by facts or authority, well-grounded" is first recorded 1640s.

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prevalent (adj.)

early 15c., "having great power or force, controlling, ruling," from Latin praevalentem (nominative praevalens) "of superior strength; mighty," present participle of praevalere "to be more able," from prae "before" (see pre-) + valere "have power, be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). Meaning "widespread, extensively existing, in general use" is from 1650s.

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evaluation (n.)
1755, "action of appraising or valuing," from French évaluation, noun of action from évaluer "to find the value of," from é- "out" (see ex-) + valuer, from Latin valere "be strong, be well; be of value, be worth" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). Meaning "job performance review" attested by 1947.
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valetudinarian (n.)
"one who is constantly concerned with his own ailments," 1703, from valetudinary (1580s), from Latin valetudinarius, from valetudo "state of health" (either good or bad), from valere "be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong") + -tudo, abstract noun suffix (see -tude). Valetudinary (adj.) "sickly" is recorded from 1580s.
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equivalent (adj.)

early 15c., "equal in value, power, or effect," from Late Latin aequivalentem (nominative aequivalens) "equivalent," present participle of aequivalere "be equivalent," from Latin aequus "equal" (see equal (adj.)) + valere "be well, be worth" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). As a noun from c. 1500, "that which is equal or corresponds to." Related: Equivalently.

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prevalence (n.)

1590s, "fact of having mastery," from French prévalence (15c.), from Medieval Latin praevalentia "superior force," from Latin praevalens, present participle of praevalere "to be more able," from prae "before" (see pre-) + valere "have power, be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). Meaning "condition of being widespread or general" is from 1713. Shakespeare has prevailment.

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avail (v.)
c. 1300, availen, "to help (someone), assist; benefit, be profitable to; be for the advantage of; have force or efficacy, serve for a purpose," apparently an Anglo-French compound of Old French a- "to" (see ad-) + vaill-, present stem of valoir "be worth," from Latin valere "be strong, be worth" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). Related: Availed; availing. As a noun, from c. 1400.
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