Etymology
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variable (n.)
"quantity that can vary in value," 1816, from variable (adj.) in mathematical sense of "quantitatively indeterminate" (1710). Related: Variably; variability.
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variable (adj.)
late 14c., of persons, "apt to change, fickle," from Old French variable "various, changeable, fickle," from Late Latin variabilis "changeable," from variare "to change" (see vary). Of weather, seasons, etc., attested from late 15c.; of stars, from 1788.
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variance (n.)
late 14c., "fact of undergoing change," from Old French variance "change, alteration; doubt, hesitation" and directly from Latin variantia, from stem of variare "to change" (see vary). Meaning "state of disagreement" is recorded from early 15c. The U.S. zoning sense of "official dispensation from a building regulation" is recorded from 1925.
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variant (n.)

"something substantially the same, but in different form," 1848, from variant (adj.).

[proof-reader]: Slip 20. Nuri, Emir of the Ruwalla, belongs to the 'chief family of the Rualla.' On Slip 33 'Rualla horse,' and Slip 38, 'killed one Rueili.' In all later slips 'Rualla.'
[author]: Should have also used Ruwala and Ruala.
[from publisher's note to "Revolt in the Desert," T.E. Lawrence, 1927]
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variant (adj.)
late 14c., "tending to change," from Old French variant and directly from Latin variantem (nominative varians), present participle of variare "to change" (see vary).
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variate (n.)
in statistics, 1899, from adjective variate (mid-15c.), from Latin variatus, past participle of variare (see vary).
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variation (n.)
late 14c., "difference, divergence," from Old French variacion "variety, diversity" and directly from Latin variationem (nominative variatio) "a difference, variation, change," from past participle stem of variare "to change" (see vary). The musical sense is attested from 1801. Related: Variational.
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varicella (n.)
"chicken-pox," medical Latin, 1764, irregular diminutive of variola (see variola). Related: Varicellous.
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varices (n.)
plural of varix "dilated vein" (c. 1400), from Latin varix "a varicose vein," which de Vaan derives from varus "bent outward, bow-legged," which is of uncertain origin (see vary).
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varicocele (n.)

"tumor in the scrotum," 1736, medical Latin, from Latin varico-, combining form of varix "dilated vein," (see varicose) + Latinized form of Greek kele "tumor, rupture, hernia" (see -cele).

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