Etymology
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usual (adj.)
late 14c., from Old French usuel "current, in currency (of money), valid" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin usualis "ordinary," from Latin usus "custom" (see use (v.)). The usual suspects is from a line delivered by Claude Rains (as a French police inspector) in "Casablanca" (1942).
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unusual (adj.)
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + usual (adj.). Related: Unusually.
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barracks (n.)
plural, and usual, form of barrack (q.v.).
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suc- 
the usual form of sub- before -c-, an assimiliation from Latin.
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abs- 
the usual form of ab- before -c-, -q-, or -t-.
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comprehendible (adj.)

1814, from comprehend + -ible. A rare native formation alongside the more usual comprehensible.

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unevitable (adj.)
from un- (1) "not" + evitable. The usual word is inevitable. Related: Unevitably.
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