Etymology
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idiolect (n.)
one's personal way of using a language, 1948, from idio- "one's own, personal" + second element abstracted from dialect. Idioglottic (1888) has a sense "using words invented in one's mind" (from Greek glotta/glossa "tongue").
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alphanumeric (adj.)
"using both letters and numbers," 1912, contracted from alphabet + numeric (see numerical).
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vault (n.2)
"a leap," especially using the hands or a pole, 1570s, from vault (v.1).
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canting (n.)
1560s, "practice of using thieves' cant," verbal noun from cant (v.1).
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maglev 

system of rail transportation using two sets of magnets, 1973, a contraction of magnetic levitation.

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non-verbal (adj.)

also nonverbal, "not using words," by 1809, from non- + verbal. Related: Non-verbally.

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DOS 

"computer operating system using a disk storage device," 1967, acronym of disk operating system.

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maximist (n.)

"one who has a fondness for quoting or using maxims," by 1827, from maxim + -ist.

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loud-speaker (n.)
also loudspeaker, "device for amplifying sound using an electric current," 1898, from loud (adj.) + speaker (n.).
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shin (v.)
"to climb by using arms and legs" (originally a nautical word), 1829, from shin (n.). Related: Shinned; shinning.
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