Etymology
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urine (n.)

c. 1300, from Old French orine, urine (12c.) and directly from Latin urina "urine," from PIE *ur- (source also of Greek ouron "urine"), variant of root *we-r- "water, liquid, milk" (source also of Sanskrit var "water," Avestan var "rain," Lithuanian jūrės "sea," Old English wær, Old Norse ver "sea," Old Norse ur "drizzling rain"), related to *eue-dh-r (see udder).

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urea (n.)
compound found in the urine of animals, 1806, Latinized from French urée (1803), from Greek ouron "urine" (see urine).
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uro- 
word-forming element meaning "urine," from Greek ouron "urine" (see urine).
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urinary (adj.)
1570s, from Modern Latin urinarius, from Latin urina (see urine).
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oliguria (n.)

in pathology, "scantiness of urine," 1843, from oligo- "small, little," + -uria, from Greek ouron "urine" (see urine).

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uretic (adj.)
1849, from Late Latin ureticus, from Greek ouretikos, from ourein (see urine).
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pyuria (n.)

"presence of pus in the urine," 1787, from medical Latin (by 1760s), from pyo- + -uria (see urine).

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anuria (n.)
"absence of urination," 1838, medical Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + ouron "urine" (see urine) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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uric (adj.)
"pertaining to or obtained from urine," 1797, from French urique, from urine (see urine). Uric acid attested from 1800.
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