Etymology
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unlike (adj.)
c. 1200, "not resembling," from un- (1) "not" + like (adj.). Similar formation in Old English ungelic, Old Frisian unlik, Old Norse ulikr, Middle Danish ulige, German ungleich.
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unlike (adv.)
c. 1300, "unevenly," from un- (1) "not" + like (adv.) (see like (adj.)). From 1590s as "in a manner differing."
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dissimilate (v.)

"make different, cause to be unlike," 1821, on model of assimilate, from dis- + Latin similis "like, resembling, of the same kind," from Old Latin semol "together" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with"). In linguistics, of sounds, "to become unlike, to diverge," by 1860. Related: Dissimilated; dissimilating.

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dissimilar (adj.)

"unlike in appearance, properties, or nature," 1620s, from dis- + similar; perhaps on analogy of French dissimilaire. Related: Dissimilarity.

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disparate (adj.)

c. 1600, "unlike in kind, essentially different, having no common ground," from Latin disparatus, past participle of disparare "divide, separate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + parare "get ready, prepare" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

The meaning seems to have been influenced in Latin by dispar "unequal, unlike" (from apparently unrelated Latin par "equal, equal-sized, well-matched"). Related: Disparately; disparateness. As a noun, "one of two or more things or characters so unlike that they cannot be compared with each other," 1580s.

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antipathic (adj.)
"opposite, unlike, averse," 1811, in a translation of Swedenborg; see antipathy + -ic. Perhaps modeled on French antipathique. In later use it tends to be a medical word for "producing contrary symptoms," in place of antipathetic.
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reversible (adj.)

"capable of being reversed" in any sense of that word, 1640s, from reverse (v.) + -ible. As a noun, "garment of a textile fabric having two faces, usually unlike, either of which may be exposed," by 1863. Related: Reversable (1580s).

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anyhow (adv.)
1740, "in any way or manner," from any + how (adv.). Unlike most other any + (interrogative) compounds, there is no record of it in Old or Middle English. Compare anyway (16c.). Also used as a conjunction, "in any case." Emphatic form any old how is recorded from 1900, American English.
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lickerish (adj.)
"fond of delicious fare," c. 1500, a corruption (as if from licker or liquor + -ish) of Middle English likerous "pleasing to the palate" (late 13c.), from Anglo-French *likerous, Old French licherous (see lecherous). Unlike the French word, it generally kept close to its literal sense. Related: Lickerishly; lickerishness.
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contrariety (n.)

c. 1400, "state or quality of being contrary, extreme opposition," from Old French contrarieté, from Late Latin contrarietatem (nominative contrarietas) "opposition," noun of quality from contrarius "opposite, opposed; contrary, reverse," from contra "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)). Meaning "something contrary to or extremely unlike another" is from mid-15c.

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