Etymology
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turbulent (adj.)

early 15c., "disorderly, tumultuous, unruly" (of persons), from Old French turbulent (12c.), from Latin turbulentus "full of commotion, restless, disturbed, boisterous, stormy," figuratively "troubled, confused," from turba "turmoil, crowd" (see turbid). In reference to weather, from 1570s. Related: Turbulently.

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turbulence (n.)

early 15c., from Late Latin turbulentia "trouble, disquiet," from Latin turbulentus (see turbulent). In reference to atmospheric eddies that affect airplanes, by 1918. Related: Turbulency.

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Katie 

fem. proper name, diminutive form of Kate. Noun Katie-bar-the-door "a brouhaha, a turbulent and combative situation" is by 1888; the notion is "get ready for trouble."

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tumultuous (adj.)

1540s, from French tumultuous (Modern French tumultueux), from Latin tumultuosus "full of bustle or confusion, disorderly, turbulent," from tumultus (see tumult). Related: Tumultuously; tumultuousness.

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tempestuous (adj.)

late 14c., from Late Latin tempestuosus "stormy, turbulent," from Latin tempestas, tempestus "storm, commotion; weather, season; occasion, time," related to tempus "time, season" (see temporal). For sense development, see tempest. The figurative sense is older in English; literal sense is from c. 1500. Related: Tempestuously; tempestuousness.

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riotous (adj.)

mid-14c., "troublesome;" late 14c., of persons, conduct, "wanton, dissolute, extravagant," from Old French riotos "argumentative, quarrelsome," from riote "dispute, quarrel, domestic strife" (see riot (n.)). The meaning "tumultuous, turbulent, of the nature of an unlawful assembly" is from mid-15c. Related: Riotously; riotousness.

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hector (v.)

"to bluster, bully, domineer," 1650s, from slang hector (n.) "a blustering, turbulent, pervicacious, noisy fellow" [Johnson], 1650s, from Hector of the "Iliad," in reference to his encouragement of his fellow Trojans to keep up the fight. Earlier in English the name was used generically for "a valiant warrior" (late 14c.). Related: Hectored; hectoring.

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boisterous (adj.)

late 15c., boistreous, "rough, coarse," an unexplained alteration of Middle English boistous (c. 1300) "rough, coarse, clumsy, violent," which itself is of unknown origin, perhaps from Anglo-French bustous "rough (road)," itself perhaps from Old French boisteos "curved, lame; uneven, rough" (Modern French boiteux), itself of obscure origin. Another guess traces it via Celtic to Latin bestia.

Of persons, "turbulent, clamorous," 1560s; OED says originally "in a distinctly bad sense," but by 1680s gradually passing into "abounding in rough but good-natured activity bordering upon excess." Related: Boisterously; boisterousness.

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roister (v.)

"bluster, swagger, be bold, noisy, vaunting, or turbulent," 1580s, from an obsolete noun roister "noisy, uncontrollable bully" (1550s, displaced or lost when roisterer began to be used, by 1745; Johnson still has roister as the main form of the noun), from French ruistre "ruffian," from Old French ruiste "boorish, gross, uncouth," from Latin rusticus "rough, coarse, awkward," literally "of the country" (see rustic (adj.)). Ralph Royster-Doyster is the title and lead character of what is or was sometimes called the first English comedy (Nicholas Udall, 1555). Related: Roistered; roistering; riosterous; roisterously.

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quiet (adj.)

late 14c., "peaceable, being in a state of rest, restful, tranquil, not moving or agitated," from Old French quiet and directly from Latin quietus "calm, at rest, free from exertion," from quies (genitive quietis) "rest" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet").

From 1510s as "peaceable, not turbulent, characterized by absence of commotion." By 1590s as "making no noise." From 1570s as "private, secret." As an adverb from 1570s. Quiet American, frequently meaning a U.S. undercover agent or spy, is from the title of Graham Greene's 1955 novel. Related: Quietly; quietness.

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