Etymology
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trousers (n.)
"garment for men, covering the lower body and each leg separately," 1610s, earlier trouzes (1580s), extended from trouse (1570s), with plural ending typical of things in pairs, from Gaelic or Middle Irish triubhas "close-fitting shorts," of uncertain origin. Early recorded use of the word indicates the garment was regarded as Celtic: "A jellous wife was like an Irish trouze, alwayes close to a mans tayle" [1630]. The unexplained, unetymological second -r- is perhaps by influence of drawers or other words in pairs ending in -ers.
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tweezers (n.)
"small pincers, diminutive tongs," 1650s, extended from tweezes, plural of tweeze "case for tweezers" (1620s), a shortening of etweese, considered as plural of etwee (1610s) "a small case," from French étui "small case" (see etui). Sense transferred from the case to the implement inside it. For form, compare trousers from trouzes.
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unutterable (adj.)
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + utterable (see utter (v.)). As a noun, from 1788; unutterables as a euphemism for "trousers" is recorded by 1826 (see inexpressible).
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nankeen (n.)

kind of cotton cloth, originally usually yellow, 1755, from Nanking, China, where it originally was made. Also "trousers or breeches made of nankeen" (1806).

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strapless (adj.)
1824 of shoes, 1839 of trousers, 1920 of gowns, 1931 of brassieres, from strap (n.) + -less.
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lederhosen (n.)
leather shorts worn in Alpine regions, 1937, from German Lederhosen, literally "leather trousers" (see leather and hose (n.)). Old English had cognate leðerhose. German hosen displaced Old High German bruch, which is from the basic Germanic word for "trousers" (see breeches).
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debag (v.)

"remove (someone's) trousers as a punishment or joke," 1902 ["An American at Oxford"], British English college slang, from de- "off, away" + bag (n.). Related: Debagged; debagging.

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suspenders (n.)
"straps for holding up trousers, etc.," 1806, American English, plural agent noun from suspend (v.).
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overalls (n.)

"loose trousers of a strong material worn by cowboys, etc.," 1782, from over (adv.) + all. Specific sense "loose fitting canvas trousers with a bib and strap top" (originally worn by workmen over other clothes to protect them from wet, dirt, etc.) is attested by 1897. Compare French surtout "overcoat," literally "an over all," from sur- "over" + tout "all."

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nicky-tam (n.)

also nicky tam, "garter worn over trousers," 1911, Scottish, from a shortened, colloquial form of knickers + Scottish & northern English dialect taum, from Old Norse taumr "cord, rein, line," cognate with Old English team, the root sense of which appears to be "that which draws" (see team (n.)). Originally a string tied by Scottish farmers around rolled-up trousers to keep the legs of them out of the dirt.

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