Etymology
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tropical (adj.)
1520s, "pertaining to the celestial tropics," from tropic + -al (1). In reference to the torrid zones of the earth, from 1690s. Meaning "hot and lush like the climate of the tropics" is first attested 1834.
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*trep- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to turn."

It forms all or part of: apotropaic; atropine; Atropos; contrive; entropy; heliotrope; isotropic; psychotropic; retrieve; trope; -trope; trophy; tropic; tropical; tropism; troposphere; troubadour; zoetrope.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit trapate "is ashamed, confused," properly "turns away in shame;" Greek trepein "to turn," tropos "a turn, direction, course," trope "a turning;" Latin trepit "he turns."
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moray (n.)

"tropical eel-like fish," 1620s, from Portuguese moreia, from Latin muraena "sea eel, lamprey," from Greek smyraina, from smyros "sea eel."

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kinkajou (n.)
Central American mammal, 1796, from French (1670s), from an Algonquian word for the wolverine; the North American word was erroneously transferred by Buffon to the tropical animal.
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jacaranda (n.)
tropical American tree, 1753, from Portuguese jacarandá, from Tupi yacaranda.
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Sabal (n.)

a genus of fan-palms of tropical Americas, 1763, said to be from a South American or Mexican name.

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Lassa 
1970 in reference to a febrile disease of tropical Africa, from Lassa, name of a village in northeastern Nigeria.
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senna (n.)
tropical shrub, 1540s, from Modern Latin senna, from Arabic sana. Earlier was sene (c. 1400), from French.
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taro (n.)
tropical food plant, 1769, from Polynesian (Tahitian or Maori) taro. Compare Hawaiian kalo.
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