Etymology
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transmission (n.)

1610s, "conveyance from one place to another," from Latin transmissionem (nominative transmissio) "a sending over or across, passage," noun of action from past-participle stem of transmittere "send over or across" (see transmit). Meaning "part of a motor vehicle that regulates power from the engine to the axle" is first recorded 1894.

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retransmission (n.)

"transmission of what has been received to another destination," 1788, from re- "back, again" + transmission.

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automatic (n.)

1902, "automatic weapon," from automatic (adj.). Meaning "motorized vehicle with automatic transmission" is from 1949.

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transaxle (n.)
1958, from transmission axle.
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trannie (n.)
also tranny "transsexual person," 1983, from transsexual + -ie. In 1960s and '70s the word was used as a slang shortening of transistor radio and in car magazines for transmission.
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hereditism (n.)
"scientific doctrine of hereditary transmission of characteristics," 1874; see heredity + -ism.
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modem (n.)
by 1937 in reference to electrical transmission of sound and other signals, contracted from modulator-demodulator; see modulator.
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dial-up (adj.)

1961 in reference to a data transmission link via public telephone network, from the verbal phrase; see dial (v.) + up (adv.).

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grid (n.)
1839, shortening of gridiron or griddle. City planning sense is from 1954 (hence gridlock). Meaning "network of transmission lines" first recorded 1926.
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contagion (n.)

late 14c., "a communicable disease; a harmful or corrupting influence," from Old French contagion and directly from Latin contagionem (nominative contagio) "a touching, contact," often in a bad sense, "a contact with something physically or morally unclean, contagion," from contingere "to touch," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tangere "to touch," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle." Meaning "infectious contact or communication" is from 1620s.

A distinction between contagion and infection is sometimes adopted, the former being limited to the transmission of disease by actual contact of the diseased part with a healthy absorbent or abraded surface, and the latter to transmission through the atmosphere by floating germs or miasmata. There are, however, cases of transmission which do not fall under either of these divisions, and there are some which fall under both. In common use no precise discrimination of the two words is attempted. [Century Dictionary, 1897]
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