Etymology
Advertisement
transmigration (n.)

c. 1300, from Old French transmigracion "exile, diaspora" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin transmigrationem (nominative transmigratio) "change of country," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin transmigrare "to wander, move, to migrate," from trans "across, beyond; over" (see trans-) + migrare "to migrate" (see migration). Originally literal, in reference to the removal of the Jews into the Babylonian captivity; general sense of "passage from one place to another" is attested from late 14c.; sense of "passage of the soul after death into another body" first recorded 1590s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
samsara (n.)

"endless cycle of death and rebirth, transmigration of souls," 1886, from Sanskrit samsara "a wandering through," from sam-, prefix denoting completeness (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with"), + sr- "to run, glide" (from PIE verbal stem *ser- "to flow;" see serum).

Related entries & more 
metempsychosis (n.)

1580s, "passing of the soul at death into another body, human or animal," from Late Latin metempsychosis, from Greek metempsychosis, from meta, here indicating "change" (see meta-) + empsykhoun "to put a soul into," from en "in" (see in- (2)) + psychē "soul" (see psyche). A Pythagorean word for transmigration of souls at death. Related: Metempsychose (v.) "transfer from one body to another" (1590s).

Related entries & more 
Pythagorean (adj.)

1540s, from Latin Pythagoreus "of or pertaining to Pythagoras" of Samos, Greek philosopher (6c. B.C.E.) said to have travelled to Egypt and Babylon, whose teachings included transmigration of the soul and vegetarianism (these are some of the commonest early allusions in English).

Also in reference to a school he supposedly founded in Crotona in Italy. As a noun, "a follower of Pythagoras," by 1540s. The Pythagorean theorem is the 47th of the first book of Euclid: The area of the square whose side is the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the areas of the squares on the other two sides.

Related entries & more