Etymology
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transition (n.)

mid-15c., transicion, in grammar, from Latin transitionem (nominative transitio) "a going across or over," noun of action from past-participle stem of transire "go or cross over" (see transient).

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transitional (adj.)

1810, from transition + -al (1). Related: Transitionally.

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metabolic (adj.)

1845 in the biological sense "exhibiting or affected by metabolism," from German metabolisch (1839), from Greek metabolikos "changeable," from metabole "a change, changing, a transition" (see metabolism). Related: Metabolically.

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metastasis (n.)

"change of substance, conversion of one substance into another," 1570s, originally in rhetoric, from Late Latin metastasis "transition," from Greek metastasis "a removing, removal; migration; a changing; change, revolution," from methistanai "to remove, change," from meta, here indicating "change" (see meta-) + histanai "to place, cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." A rhetorical term in Late Latin for "a sudden transition in subjects," medical use for "shift of disease from one part of the body to another" dates from 1660s in English. Related: Metastatic.

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Segway 

trademark name (Segway Inc., Bedford, New Hampshire, U.S.), in use from 2001; according to the company, chosen for similarity to segue (q.v.) on notion of "a smooth transition from one place to another," with probable influence of way (n.).

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seamless (adj.)

c. 1400, semeles, of a garment, "woven without a seam," from seam (n.) + -less. The figurative sense of "whole, integrated" is attested by 1862. Seamless transition is attested by 1975. Seam-free (1946) was a hosiery advertiser's word. Related: Seamlessly; seamlessness.

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midlife (n.)

also mid-life, 1837, from mid (adj.) + life. Middle-life is from early 14c. Midlife crisis "transition of identity and self-confidence that can occur in middle-aged individuals" is attested by 1965 (crisis of mid-life is by 1963).

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segue (n.)

1740, an instruction in musical scores, from Italian segue, "now follows," a direction to play into the following movement without a break; third person singular of seguire "to follow," from Latin sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow").

The extended noun sense of "transition without a break" is from 1937; the verb in this sense is recorded by 1958.

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hypertext (n.)

1969, from hyper- "over, above" + text (n.).

In place of the verbal connectives that are used in normal text, such as topic or transition sentences, hypertext connects nodes ... through links. The primary purpose of a link is to connect one card, node or frame and another card, frame or node that enables the user to jump from one to another. [David H. Jonassen, "Hypertext/hypermedia," 1989]
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reveal (v.)

c. 1400, revelen, "disclose, divulge, make known (supernaturally or by divine agency, as religious truth)," from Old French reveler "reveal" (14c.), from Latin revelare "reveal, uncover, disclose," literally "unveil," from re- "back, again," here probably indicating "opposite of" or transition to an opposite state (see re-) + velare "to cover, veil," from velum "a veil" (see veil (n.)). Related: Revealed; revealer; revealing. Meaning "display, make clear or visible, expose to sight" is from c. 1500.

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