Etymology
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transformer (n.)

c. 1600, "one who or that which transforms," agent noun from transform (v.). Meaning "device to reduce electrical currents" is from 1882.

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transform (v.)
Origin and meaning of transform

mid-14c., "change the form of" (transitive), from Old French transformer (14c.), from Latin transformare "change in shape, metamorphose," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + formare "to form" (see form (v.)). Intransitive sense "undergo a change of form" is from 1590s. Related: Transformed; transforming.

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jigger (n.1)

"1.5-ounce shot glass," 1836, American English, in early use also of the drink itself, probably from jigger "illicit distillery" (1824), a word of unknown origin. Or else perhaps from jigger (n.2) "tiny mite or flea." As a name for various appliances the word is attested by 1726, from jig. In telegraphy it was a small transformer used for regulating and maintaining the difference of potential between terminals.

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