Etymology
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transcribe (v.)
1550s, from Latin transcribere "to copy, write again in another place, write over, transfer," from trans "across, beyond; over" (see trans-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). To do it poorly is to transcribble (1746). Related: Transcribed; transcriber; transcribing.
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transcript (n.)
"written copy of a document," c. 1300, from Medieval Latin transcriptum, neuter past participle of Latin transcribere (see transcribe).
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transcription (n.)

1590s, from French transcription, from Late Latin transcriptionem (nominative transcriptio), noun of action from past-participle stem of transcribere (see transcribe). Biological sense is from 1961. Related: Transcriptional; transcriptionist.

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*skribh- 
*skrībh-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to cut, separate, sift;" an extended form of root *sker- (1) "to cut."

It forms all or part of: ascribe; ascription; circumscribe; conscript; conscription; describe; description; festschrift; inscribe; inscription; manuscript; postscript; prescribe; prescription; proscribe; sans-serif; scribble; scribe; script; scriptorium; scripture; scrivener; serif; shrift; shrive; subscribe; superscribe; superscript; transcribe; scarification; scarify.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek skariphasthai "to scratch an outline, sketch;" Latin scribere "to write" (to carve marks in wood, stone, clay, etc.); Lettish skripat "scratch, write;" Old Norse hrifa "scratch."
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copyist (n.)

"one whose occupation is to transcribe documents," 1690s, from copy (n.) + -ist. Earlier was copist (1580s).

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copy (v.)

late 14c., "make a copy of, duplicate" (a text or document), from Old French copier (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin copiare "to transcribe," originally "to write in plenty," from Latin copia "plenty" (see copy (n.)). Hence, "to write an original text many times."

Figurative sense of "to imitate, to follow as an example" is attested from 1640s. Of computer data, by 1953. Meaning "send a copy (of a letter, later e-mail, etc.) to a third party" is attested by 1983. Related: Copied; copying.

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description (n.)

late 14c., descripcioun, "act of delineating or depicting," from Old French description (12c.) and directly from Latin descriptionem (nominative descriptio) "representation, description, copy," noun of action from past-participle stem of describere "write down, transcribe, copy, sketch," from de "down" (see de-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut"). Via the notion of "qualities which represent a class or individual" comes the sense "type, sort, kind" (1781).

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