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train (n.)

early 14c., "a drawing out, delay;" late 14c., "trailing part of a skirt, gown, or cloak;" also "retinue, procession," from Old French train "tracks, path, trail (of a robe or gown); act of dragging," from trainer "to pull, drag, draw," from Vulgar Latin *traginare, extended from *tragere "to pull," back-formation from tractus, past participle of Latin trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)).,

General sense of "series, progression, succession, continuous course" is from late 15c.; train of thought is attested from 1650s. The railroad sense "locomotive and the cars coupled to it" is recorded from 1820 (publication year, dated 1816), from the notion of a "trailing succession" of wagons or carriages pulled by a mechanical engine.

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train (v.)
"to discipline, teach, bring to a desired state by means of instruction," 1540s, probably from earlier sense of "draw out and manipulate in order to bring to a desired form" (late 14c.), specifically of the growth of branches, vines, etc. from mid-15c.; from train (n.). Sense of "point or aim" (a firearm, etc.) is from 1841. Sense of "fit oneself for a performance by a regimen or exercise" is from 1832. The meaning "to travel by railway" is recorded from 1856. Related: Trained; training.
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train-spotting (n.)
1959 (train spotter attested from 1958), chiefly British English, in reference to the hobby of recording the numbers of railway locomotives one has observed; from train (n.) in the railroad sense + verbal noun from spot (v.).
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trainee (n.)
1841, from train (v.) in the "instruct" sense + -ee.
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untrained (adj.)
1540s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of train (v.).
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trainer (n.)
c. 1600, "one who educates or instructs," agent noun from train (v.). Meaning "one who prepares another for feats requiring physical fitness" is from 1823, originally of horse-trainers.
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entrain (v.2)
"get on board a locomotive train," 1860s, from en- (1) "in, into" + train (n.). Related: Entrained.
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retrain (v.)

also re-train, "train again, teach (someone already skilled or trained) a new skill," 1905, from re- "back, again" + train (v.). Related: Retrained; retraining.

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entrain (v.1)
"to draw along," 1560s, a term in chemistry, from French entrainer (12c.), from en- "away" (see en- (1)) + trainer "to drag" (see train (n.)). Related: Entrained; entrainment.
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