Etymology
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trader (n.)
"dealer, trafficker, one engaged in commerce," 1580s, agent noun from trade (v.).
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dealership (n.)

"the business of an authorized trader," 1916, from dealer + -ship.

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Mackenzie 

river in Canada, named for Scottish fur trader and explorer Sir Alexander Mackenzie, who discovered and explored it 1789.

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Chisholm Trail 

1866, named for Jesse Chisholm (c. 1806-1868), half-breed Cherokee trader and government agent who first plied it. The surname is from a barony in England, probably from Old English cisel "gravel."

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insolvent (adj.)
1590s, "unable to pay one's debts," from in- (1) "not" + Latin solventem "paying" (see solvent). Originally of one who was not a trader; only traders could become bankrupt.
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cozen (v.)

"to cheat, defraud," 1560s, of uncertain origin; perhaps from French cousiner "cheat on pretext of being a cousin;" or from Middle English cosyn "fraud, trickery" (mid-15c.), which is perhaps related to Old French coçon "dealer, merchant, trader," from Latin cocionem "horse dealer." Related: Cozened; cozening; cozenage.

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chap (n.)

1570s, "customer," short for obsolete chapman in its secondary sense "purchaser, trader" (also see cheap). Colloquial familiar sense of "lad, fellow, man or boy" is first attested 1716, usually with a qualifying adjective. Compare slang (tough) customer and German Kunde "customer, purchaser," colloquially "fellow."

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jockey (v.)
1708, "trick, outwit, gain advantage," from jockey (n.) perhaps in its former secondary sense of "horse trader" (1680s) and reflecting their reputation. Meaning "to ride a horse in a race" is from 1767. Related: Jockeyed; jockeying.
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cit (n.)

"inhabitant of a city," colloquial shortening of citizen, 1640s; especially "a London cockney," as contrasted to a country man or a gentleman, usually with some measure of opprobrium (Johnson defines it as "A pert low townsman; a pragmatical trader").

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interlope (v.)
"intrude where one has no business," especially with a view to gain the advantage or profits of another (as a trader without a proper licence), early 17c., probably a back-formation from interloper (q.v.). Related: Interloped; interloping.
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