Etymology
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toss (v.)
mid-15c., "to lift or throw with a sudden movement," of uncertain origin, possibly from a Scandinavian source (compare dialectal Norwegian tossa "to strew, spread"). Food preparation sense (with reference to salad, etc.) is recorded from 1723. Intransitive sense "be restless; throw oneself about" is from 1550s. Related: Tossed; tossing.
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toss (n.)
"an act of throwing," 1630s, from toss (v.). Meaning "a coin toss" is from 1798.
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toss-up (n.)
"even matter," 1809, from earlier sense of "a flipping of a coin to arrive at a decision" (c. 1700), from verbal phrase, from toss (v.) + up (adv.).
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tosspot (n.)
"heavy drinker," 1560s, from toss (v.) + pot (n.1).
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tosser (n.)
term of contempt in British slang, by 1977, probably from slang toss off "act of masturbation" (1735). Agent noun from toss (v.). Compare jerk (n.).
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pitch-and-toss (n.)

1810, from pitch (v.1) + toss (v.).

A game in which the players pitch coins at a mark, that one whose coin lies nearest to the mark having the privilege of tossing up all the coins together and retaining all the coins that come down " head " up. The next nearest player tosses those that are left, and retains all that come down "head" up, and so on until the coins are all gone. [Century Dictionary]
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tassel (n.)
c. 1300, "mantle fastener," from Old French tassel "tassel, fringe, hem; a fastening, clasp" (12c., Modern French tasseau), from Vulgar Latin *tassellus, said to be from Latin taxillus "small die or cube," a diminutive of talus "knucklebone (used as a die in gaming), ankle" (see talus (n.1)). But OED finds this doubtful and calls attention to the variant form tossel and suggests association with toss (v.). Meaning "hanging bunch of small cords" is first recorded late 14c.
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chuck (n.2)

"slight blow under the chin," 1610s, from chuck (v.1). Meaning "a toss, a throw" is from 1862.

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blanket (v.)
c. 1600, "to cover with or as with a blanket;" also "to toss in a blanket" (as punishment), from blanket (n.). Related: Blanketed; blanketing.
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shy (v.1)
"to throw (a missile) with a jerk or toss," 1787, colloquial, of unknown origin and uncertain connection to shy (adj.). Related: Shied; shying.
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