Etymology
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topic (n.)
1630s, "a class of considerations from which probable arguments can be drawn," singular form of "Topics" (1560s), the name of a work by Aristotle on logical and rhetorical generalities, from Latin Topica, from Greek Ta Topika, literally "matters concerning topoi," "commonplaces," neuter plural of noun use of topikos "pertaining to a common place, of a place, local," from topos "place" (see topos). The meaning "matter treated in speech or writing, subject, theme" is first recorded 1720.
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topical (adj.)
1580s, "pertaining to a place;" see topic + -al (1). Medical sense "applied to a particular part of the body" is from c. 1600. Meaning "of or pertaining to topics of the day" is from 1873. Related: Topically.
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rambling (adj.)

1620s, "wandering about from place to place," present-participle adjective from ramble (v.). From 1630s as "wandering from topic to topic."

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ley (n.)
"line of a prehistoric track; alignment of natural and artificial features," 1922 [Alfred Watkins], apparently a variant of lea. Popular topic in Britain in 1920s-30s and again 1960s-70s.
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newsgroup (n.)

"internet discussion group within the Usenet system containing messages posted from users in different locations," by 1985, from news (n.), perhaps on the notion of sharing news of a particular topic, + group (n.).

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popularize (v.)

"to make a complex topic intelligible to the common people," 1833; see popular + -ize. Earlier "to cater to popular taste" (1590s); "to make popular" (1797). Related: Popularized; popularizer; popularizing.

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megadeath (n.)

"the death of one million persons" as a measure of the effectiveness of nuclear weapons, 1953, from mega- in scientific sense ("one million") + death (n.) "a dying." The resulting one million dead bodies would be a megacorpse, according to writings on the topic.

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resort (v.)

c. 1400, resorten, "advance, proceed; come or go; return (to a subject or topic); go to (someone) for aid, turn to for protection, mercy, etc.," from Old French resortir "recourse, appeal" (Modern French ressortir), from resort "resource, a help, an aid" (see resort (n.)). Related: Resorted; resorting.

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mastery (n.)

c. 1200, mesterie, maistrie, "state or condition of being a master, control, dominance," also "superiority, ascendancy, the upper hand, victory in war or a contest;" from Old French maistrie (Modern French maîtrise), from maistre "master" (see master (n.)). Meaning "intellectual command" (of a topic, art, etc.), "expert skill" is from c. 1300.

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locus (n.)
(plural loci), 1715, "place, spot, locality," from Latin locus "a place, spot; appointed place, position; locality, region, country; degree, rank, order; topic, subject," from Old Latin stlocus, a word of uncertain origin. Used by Latin writers for Greek topos. Mathematical sense by 1750.
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