Etymology
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took 
past tense of take (v.), from late Old English toc, past tense of tacan.
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Gang of Four 
1976, translating Chinese sirenbang, the nickname given to the four leaders of the Cultural Revolution who took the fall in Communist China after the death of Mao.
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corresponding (adj.)

1570s, "related by correspondence," present-participle adjective from correspond. Not common until 19c., when it took on the adjectival function of correspondent. Related: Correspondingly (1836).

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Baphomet 
name of the idol which the Templars were accused of worshipping, regarded as a corruption of Mahomet (see Muhammad), "a name which took strange shapes in the Middle Ages" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Baphometic.
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Seychelles 

renamed 1756 in honor of French finance minister Jean Moreau de Séchelles; the spelling was altered by the English when they took the islands from France in 1794. Related: Seychellois.

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Spitalfields 
district east of London, famed for the work of refugee Huguenot weavers who took up residence there, from St. Mary Spital, from spital, a Middle English shortened form of hospital, sometimes also spittle, hence spittle-man "one who lives in a hospital."
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japan (v.)
"to coat with lacquer or varnish" in the manner of Japanese lacquer-work, 1680s, from Japan. Related: japanned; japanning. Hence also japonaiserie (1896, from French). Japanned work being generally black, japanned took on a slang sense of "ordained into the priesthood."
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Waterloo (n.)
village near Brussels; the great battle there took place June 18, 1815; extended sense of "a final, crushing defeat" is first attested 1816 in letter of Lord Byron. The second element in the place name is from Flemish loo "sacred wood" (see lea (n.)).
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Priscillian 

mid-15c. in reference to a Christian heresy that took root in 4c. Spain, from Priscillian, bishop of Ávila, whose followers held ascetic and Gnostic doctrines. For the name, see Priscilla. Also a name given to 2c. Montanists, from their prophetess Prisca or Priscilla.

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sepoy (n.)

"native of India in British military service," 1717, from Portuguese sipae, "native soldier," in distinction from a European soldier, from Urdu sipahi, from Persian sipahi "soldier, horseman," from sipah "army." The Sepoy Mutiny against British rule in India took place 1857-8.

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