Etymology
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together (adv.)
Old English togædere "so as to be present in one place, in a group, in an accumulated mass," from to (see to) + gædere "together" (adv.), apparently a variant of the adverb geador "together," from Proto-Germanic *gaduri- "in a body," from PIE *ghedh- "to unite, join, fit" (see good, and compare gather).

In reference to single things, "so as to be unified or integrated," from c. 1300. Adjective meaning "self-assured, free of emotional difficulties" is first recorded 1966. German cognate zusammen has as second element the Old High German verbal cognate of English same (Old English also had tosamne "together").
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go together (v.)
1520s, "accompany," see go (v.) + together (adv.). From 1710 as "agree with, harmonize with;" 1899 as "be courting."
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get-together (n.)
1911, from get (v.) + together (adv.). The verbal phrase is attested by c. 1400 as "collect, gather;" meaning "to meet, to assemble" is from 1690s. As "to organize" (oneself), by 1962.
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togetherness (n.)
1650s, "state of being together," from together + -ness. Sense of "fellowship, fellow-feeling," is from 1930.
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altogether (adv.)
"wholly, entirely, completely," early 13c., altogedere, a strengthened form of all (also see together); used in the sense of "a whole" from 1660s. OED notes, "There is a common tendency to write altogether where all together is logically preferable," and gives examples from 1765. The altogether "a condition of nakedness" is from 1894.
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coition (n.)

1540s, "a going together, a coming together," from Late Latin coitionem (nominative coitio) "a coming together, a meeting; copulation," noun of action from coitus, past participle of coire "to go together, come together" (see coitus). Sexual meaning "copulation" is attested in English from 1610s (coiture in the same sense is from 1570s).

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conjoin (v.)

late 14c., "to join together, unite; form a union or league," from Old French conjoindre "meet, come together" (12c.), from Latin coniungere "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Related: Conjoined, conjoining. Conjoined in reference to "Siamese twins" is recorded from 1749.

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conjoint (adj.)

"united, connected, associated," late 14c., from Old French conjoint, past participle of conjoindre "to meet, come together" (12c.), from Latin coniungere "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join." Related: Conjointly (early 14c.).

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contex (v.)

"to weave together," 1540s, verb from Latin contexere "to weave together" (see context). Obsolete after 17c.

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cohesion (n.)

1670s, "act or state of sticking together," from French cohsion, from Latin cohaesionem (nominative cohaesio) "a sticking together," noun of action from past participle stem of cohaerere "to stick together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation).

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