Etymology
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sing (n.)
"act of singing," especially collective, 1850, from sing (v.).
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sing (v.)

Old English singan "to chant, sing, celebrate, or tell in song," also used of birds (class III strong verb; past tense sang, past participle sungen), from Proto-Germanic *sengwan (source also of Old Saxon singan, Old Frisian sionga, Middle Dutch singhen, Dutch zingen, Old High German singan, German singen, Gothic siggwan, Old Norse syngva, Swedish sjunga), from PIE root *sengwh-"to sing, make an incantation."

There are said to be no related forms in other languages, unless perhaps it is connected to Greek omphe "voice" (especially of a god), "oracle;" and Welsh dehongli "explain, interpret." The typical Indo-European root is represented by Latin canere (see chant (v.)). Other words meaning "sing" derive from roots meaning "cry, shout," but Irish gaibim is literally "take, seize," with sense evolution via "take up" a song or melody.

The criminal slang sense of "to confess to authorities" is attested from 1610s. 

Every child should be taught, from its youth, to govern its voice discreetly and dexterously, as it does its hands ; and not to be able to sing should be more disgraceful than not being able to read or write. For it is quite possible to lead a virtuous and happy life without books, or ink ; but not without wishing to sing, when we are happy ; nor without meeting with continual occasions when our song, if right, would be a kind service to others. [Ruskin, "Rock Honeycomb"]
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sing-song (adj.)
also singsong, musically repetitive and unvarying, 1734, from earlier use as a noun meaning "a jingling ballad" (c. 1600), from sing (v.) + song (n.).
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sing-along 
1959, noun and adjective, from verbal phrase; see sing (v.) + along (adv.). Originally associated with U.S. music producer Mitch Miller (1911-2010).
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chant (v.)

late 14c., "to sing," from Old French chanter "to sing, celebrate" (12c.), from Latin cantare "to sing," originally frequentative of canere "sing" (which it replaced), from PIE root *kan- "to sing."

The frequentative quality of the word was no longer felt in Latin, and by the time French emerged the word had entirely displaced canere. Meaning "to sing as in the church service, in a style between song and recitation" is by 1580s. Related: Chanted; chanting.

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chanticleer (n.)

"a cock," c. 1300, from Old French Chantecler (Modern French Chanteclair), quasi-proper name of the cock in medieval stories of Reynard the Fox; literally "sing-loud" or "sing-clear," from chanter "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing") + cler (see clear (adj.)). Ben Jonson makes it chant-it-clear.

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recant (v.)

"to unsay, to contradict or withdraw a declaration or proposition," 1530s, from Latin recantare "recall, revoke," from re- "back" (see re-) + cantare, literally "to chant, to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). The English word is from the Reformation; the Latin verb is a loan-translation of Greek palinoidein "recant," from palin "back" + oeidein "to sing." Related: Recanted; recanting. It was used occasionally 17c. in an etymological sense of "sing over again" (with re- = "again").

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cantata (n.)
1724, "musical recitation of a story," from Italian cantata, literally "that which is sung," past participle of cantare "to sing," from Latin cantare "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").
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concent (n.)

"harmony, concord of sounds," 1580s, from Latin concentus "a singing together, harmony," from concinere "to sing or sound together," from con- "with, together" (see con-) + canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). Often misspelled consent or confused with that word.

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