Etymology
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tissue (n.)

mid-14c., "band or belt of rich material," from Old French tissu "a ribbon, headband, belt of woven material" (c. 1200), noun use of tissu "woven, interlaced," past participle of tistre "to weave," from Latin texere "to weave, to make," from PIE root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate." The biological sense is first recorded 1831, from French, introduced c. 1800 by French anatomist Marie-François-Xavier Bichal (1771-1802). Meaning "piece of absorbent paper used as a handkerchief" is from 1929. Tissue-paper is from 1777, supposedly so called because it was made to be placed between tissues to protect them.

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histology (n.)

"study of organic tissues," 1847, from histo- "tissue" + -logy. Related: Histological.

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granuloma (n.)

"granulated tissue produced by certain diseases," from Latin granulum "granule" (see granular) + -oma, on model of glaucoma, etc.

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cellulitis (n.)

"inflammation of the cellular tissue," 1832, from Latin cellula, diminutive of cella "cell" (see cell) + -itis "inflammation."

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biocide (n.)

"destruction of living tissue or living species," 1947, from bio- + -cide. An older word for it was biolysis.

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wipe (n.)

1640s, "act of wiping," from wipe (v.). From 1708 as "something used in wiping" (especially a handkerchief); 1971 as "disposable absorbent tissue."

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xylem (n.)

"woody tissue in higher plants," 1875, from German Xylem, coined from Greek xylon "wood" (see xylo-).

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dysplasia (n.)

"abnormal growth or development of tissue, cells, etc.," 1935, Modern Latin, from dys- "abnormal, imperfect" + -plasia "formation, growth, development." Related: Dysplastic.

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connective (adj.)

"having the power of connecting, serving to connect," 1650s, from connect + -ive (if from Latin, it likely would have been *connexive). Connective tissue is from 1839.

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