Etymology
Advertisement
OxyContin 
brand name of an oxycodone compound marketed in U.S. from 1996. Second element from continuous (i.e. "time-released").
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Marcomanni 

name of an ancient Teutonic tribe that harassed the Roman Empire from time to time from the days of Caesar to 4c., from Latin Marcomanni, from a Germanic compound, literally "men of the border;" first element cognate with Old High German mark, Old English mearc "border" (see march (n.2)). For second element, see man (n.). Related: Marcomannic.

Related entries & more 
Taino 
an indigenous people of the Caribbean at the time of Columbus, from Taino (Arawakan) nitayno "the first, the good." Also the name of their language. Compare Arawakan.
Related entries & more 
Irene 

fem. proper name, from French Irène, from Latin Irene, from Greek Eirēnē, literally "peace, time of peace," a word of unknown etymology.

Related entries & more 
Cronus 

from Latinized form of Greek Kronos, youngest of the first generation of Titans, and their leader; a name of uncertain origin but probably not related to Khronos, personification of time, except in folk-etymology.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Parkinson's Law 
1955 (in the "Economist" of Nov. 19), named for its deviser, British historian and journalist Cyril Northcote Parkinson (1909-1993): "work expands to fill the time available for its completion."
Related entries & more 
Timothy 
masc. proper name, from French Timothée, from Latin Timotheus, from Greek Timotheos, literally "honoring God," from time "honor, respect" (see timocracy) + theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts).
Related entries & more 
Cher 
U.S. pop performer, born Cherilyn Sarkisian (1946). As a given name for girls in U.S., it hit a bump of popularity 1972-73 around the time she starred in a popular TV variety show.
Related entries & more 
Kali 
a name of Devi, the Hindu mother-goddess, in her black-skinned death-aspect, 1798, from Sanskrit kali, literally "the black one," fem. of kalah "blue-black, black," a word from a Dravidian language. Also taken as the fem. of kala "time" (as destroyer).
Related entries & more 
Edwardian (adj.)
1861, in reference to the medieval English kings of that name; 1908 in the sense of "of the time or reign of Edward VII" (1901-10), and, since 1934, especially with reference to the men's clothing styles (as in teddy-boy, 1954, for which see Teddy). From Edward + -ian.
Related entries & more