Etymology
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tic (n.)
twitching of a facial muscle, 1822, often a shortening of tic douloureux "severe facial neuralgia," literally "painful twitch" (1798), from French tic "a twitching disease of horses" (17c.), of unknown origin. Klein suggests an imitative origin; Diez compare it to Italian ticchio "whim, caprice, ridiculous habit," itself of unknown origin.
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tic douloureux (n.)
1798, French, literally "painful twitching;" see tic.
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crisscross (n.)

also criss-cross, 1833, "a checked pattern in cloth," 1848, "a crossing or intersection," from Middle English crist(s)-crosse (early 15c.), earlier Cristes-cros (c. 1200) "the Cross of Christ," also "the sign of the cross," from late 14c. often "referring to the mark of a cross formerly written before the alphabet in hornbooks. The mark itself stood for the phrase Christ-cross me speed ('May Christ's cross give me success'), a formula said before reciting the alphabet" [Barnhart]. It has long been used without awareness of its origin.

How long agoo lerned ye, 'Crist crosse me spede!'
Have ye no more lernyd of youre a b c,
[Lydgate, "The Prohemy of a Marriage Betwix an Olde Man and a Yonge Wife," c. 1475]

It is attested from 1860 as an old name for tic-tac-toe. As an adjective, by 1846. As a verb, by 1818. 

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tick (n.2)
mid-15c., "light touch or tap," probably from tick (v.) and cognate with Dutch tik, Middle High German zic, and perhaps echoic. Meaning "sound made by a clock" is probably first recorded 1540s; tick-tock as the sound of a clock is recorded from 1845.
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tick (n.3)
"credit," 1640s, shortening of ticket (n.).
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ticket (v.)
1610s, "attach a ticket to, put a label on," from ticket (n.). Meaning "issue a (parking) ticket to" is from 1955. Related: Ticketed; ticketing.
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tickled (adj.)
"pleased, happy," 1580s, past-participle adjective from tickle (v.). To be tickled pink is from 1909.
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tickle (v.)
c. 1300 (implied in tickling) "to touch lightly so as to cause a peculiar and uneasy or thrilling sensation in the nerves," of uncertain origin, possibly a frequentative form of tick (v.) in its older sense of "to touch." Some suggest a metathesis of Middle English kittle, which is from a shared Germanic word for "to tickle," but tickle is attested earlier. The Old English form was tinclian.

Meaning "to excite agreeably" (late 14c.) is a translation of Latin titillare. Meaning "to poke or touch so as to excite laughter" is from early 15c.; figurative sense of "to excite, amuse" is attested from 1680s. The noun is recorded from 1801. To tickle (one's) fancy is from 1640s. Related: Tickler.
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ticky-tacky (n.)
"inferior, cheap material," 1962 (in song "Little Boxes" by U.S. political folk-singer Malvina Reynolds, 1900-1978), reduplication of tacky. As an adjective by 1967.
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fern-tickles (n.)
"freckles, spots or blemishes on the body" (late 14c.), of unknown origin. Related: Fern-tickled "having spots or blemishes on the skin."
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