Etymology
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thunder (n.)

mid-13c., from Old English þunor "thunder, thunderclap; the god Thor," from Proto-Germanic *thunraz (source also of Old Norse þorr, Old Frisian thuner, Middle Dutch donre, Dutch donder, Old High German donar, German Donner "thunder"), from PIE *(s)tene- "to resound, thunder" (source also of Sanskrit tanayitnuh "thundering," Persian tundar "thunder," Latin tonare "to thunder"). Swedish tordön is literally "Thor's din." The unetymological -d- also is found in Dutch and Icelandic versions of the word (compare sound (n.1)). Thunder-stick, imagined word used by primitive peoples for "gun," attested from 1904.

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thunder (v.)
13c., from Old English þunrian, from the source of thunder (n.). Figurative sense of "to speak loudly, threateningly, or bombastically" is recorded from mid-14c. Related: Thundered; thundering. Compare Dutch donderen, German donnern.
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thunderbolt (n.)
mid-15c., from thunder (n.) + bolt (n.) "arrow, projectile."
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thunderous (adj.)
1580s, from thunder (n.) + -ous. Related: Thunderously.
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thunderstorm (n.)
also thunder-storm, 1560s, from thunder (n.) + storm (n.).
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thunderclap (n.)
also thunder-clap, late 14c., from thunder (n.) + clap (n.1).
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thunderhead (n.)
"high-piled cumulus cloud," one likely to develop into a thunderstorm, 1861, from thunder (n.) + head (n.).
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tonite (n.)
explosive used in blasting, 1881, from Latin tonare "to thunder" (see thunder (n.)) + -ite (2).
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thunderstruck (adj.)
1610s, from thunder (n.) + struck. Originally figurative; the literal sense (1630s) always has been rare. Thunder-strike (v.), is a back-formation.
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thunderbird (n.)
legendary cause of thunder in many Native American cultures, 1848, a translation of native words, such as Ojibwa (Algonquian) aninikii, Lakotah (Siouan) wakiya, Klamath /lmelmnis/. See thunder (n.) + bird (n.1). In Lakhota, "the thunderbirds call" is "the usual expression for thunder" [Bright].
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