Etymology
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theism (n.)

1670s, "belief in a deity or deities," (as opposed to atheism); by 1711 as "belief in one god" (as opposed to polytheism); by 1714 as "belief in the existence of God as creator and ruler of the universe" (as opposed to deism), the usual modern sense; see theist + -ism.

Theism assumes a living relation of God to his creatures, but does not define it. It differs from deism in that the latter is negative and involves a denial of revelation, while the former is affirmative, and underlies Christianity. One may be a theist and not be a Christian, but he cannot be a Christian and not be a theist. [Century Dictionary]
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allotheism (n.)
"worship of strange gods," 1650s, from allo- "other" + -theism.
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antitheism (n.)
also anti-theism, "opposition to theism; opposition to belief in God or gods," 1788; see anti- + theism.
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misotheism (n.)

"hatred of God," 1846, from Latinized form of Greek misothios; see miso- + -theism. Related: Misotheist; misotheistic.

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bitheism (n.)
"belief in two gods" (typically a good and an evil one), 1857, from bi- "two" + -theism.
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egotheism (n.)
"deification of the self," 1855, from ego + -theism. Related: Egotheist (1849); egotheistic.
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monotheism (n.)

"doctrine or belief that there is but one god," 1650s, from mono- "single, alone" + -theism "belief (of a specified kind) in God, a god, or gods."

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ditheism (n.)

"belief in the existence of two supreme gods, religious dualism," 1670s, from di- (1) + -theism. Related: Ditheist; ditheistic.

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-theism 
word-forming element meaning "belief (of a specified kind) in God, a god, or gods," from Greek theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -ism.
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autotheism (n.)
"self-deification," 1610s, from auto- + -theism. The religion of one who mistakes his own inner voices for God's voice in him. Also used in a theological sense (1580s) for "the regarding of the second person of the Trinity as God entire." Related: Autotheist; autotheistic.
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