Etymology
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Texas 
Mexican province, briefly an independent nation and now a U.S. state, from Spanish Texas, Tejas, earlier pronounced "ta-shas," originally an ethnic name, from Caddo (eastern Texas Indian tribe) taysha "friends, allies," written by the Spanish as a plural. Related: Texan. Baseball Texas-leaguer "ball popped up just over the head of the infielders and falling too close for outfielders to catch" is recorded from 1905, named for the minor league that operated in Texas from 1902 (one theory is that outfielders played unusually deep in Texas because hit balls bounced hard off the hard, sun-baked ground).
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Tejano 
"native or inhabitant of Texas," 1925, from American Spanish, formerly Texano "a Texan" (see Texas).
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Tex 
nickname for a Texan, by 1903, from Texas.
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Tex-Mex (adj.)
by 1914, from Texas + Mexico. An earlier noun for "Texan of Mexican background" was Texican (1863).
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Houston 
city in Texas, U.S., founded 1836 and named for first president of Texas, Sam Houston. The family name is from the barony of Houston in Lanark.
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cantina (n.)
"bar room, saloon," 1892, Texas and U.S. southwest dialect, from Spanish and Italian form of canteen in the "wine cellar" sense.
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honky-tonk (n.)

"cheap night club," by 1893, American English, of unknown origin. It starts to appear frequently about 1893 in newspapers in Texas and Oklahoma; a much-reprinted snippet defines it as "a particularly vicious and low-grade theater." In the Fort Worth, Texas, "Gazette" in 1889 it seems to be the name of a particular theater, and the Marshall, Texas, "Messenger" of May 27, 1892, mentions the "Honk-E-Tonk district" as "the most disreputable part of town." As a type of music played in that sort of low saloon, it is attested by 1921.

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motherfucker (n.)

also mother-fucker, by 1956, usually simply an intensive of fucker. It is implied in clipped form mother (with the context made clear) by 1928; motherfucking is by 1906. Abbreviation m.f. (for motherfucking) is in a rendition of soldier talk in Pound's "Pisan Cantos" (1948).

A short time after he returned, appellant drew a six-shooter and told deceased, in a loud tone of voice, that he would shoot his God damn heart out, and called him a mother-fucking son of a bitch. He held his pistol on him a little while, and then put it in his pocket, and stood there some time. [account of Puryear vs. State of Texas in Court of Criminal Appeals of Texas, "The Southwestern Reporter," vol. 98, 1907, p. 258. The homicide at the center of the case took place in Austin, Texas, March 3, 1906]
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El Paso 
city in Texas, named for the nearby pass where the Rio Grande emerges from the Rockies, Spanish, short for el paso del norte "the northern pass;" see pass (n.1).
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mesquite (n.)

type of American shrub of the pea family, found from Texas and California to Chile, 1759, from Mexican Spanish mezquite, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) mizquitl "mesquite." It is noted for its heavy, hard wood.

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