Etymology
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terminate (v.)
early 15c., "bring to an end," from Latin terminatus, past participle of terminare "to mark the end or boundary," from terminus "end, limit" (see terminus). Intransitive sense of "to come to an end" is recorded from 1640s; meaning "dismiss from a job" is recorded from 1973; that of "to assassinate" is from 1975. Related: Terminated; terminating.
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terminable (adj.)
early 15c., from Latin stem of terminate (v.) + -able.
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spherical (adj.)
1520s, from sphere + -ical. Related: Spherically. A spherical number (1640s) is one whose powers always terminate in the same digit as the number itself (5, 6, and 10 are the only ones).
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finish (v.)
late 14c., "to bring to an end;" mid-15c., "to come to an end" (intransitive), from Old French finiss-, present participle stem of fenir "stop, finish, come to an end; die" (13c.), from Latin finire "to limit, set bounds; put an end to; come to an end," from finis "that which divides, a boundary, border," figuratively "a limit, an end, close, conclusion; an extremity, highest point; greatest degree," which is of unknown origin, perhaps related to figere "to fasten, fix" (see fix (v.)). Meaning "to kill, terminate the existence of" is from 1755.
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conclude (v.)

early 14c., "confute or frustrate an opponent in argument, end an argument by winning it," from Latin concludere "to shut up, enclose," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + -cludere, combining form of claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)).

Meanings "reach a mental determination, deduce; infer or determine by reason" are from late 14c., a sense also in Latin. General sense of "bring to an end, finish, terminate," and intransitive sense of "come to an end" are from late 14c. Meaning "settle, arrange, determine finally" is from early 15c. Sometimes in Middle English it was used in the etymological sense, "shut in" (late 14c.). Related: Concluded; concluding.

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prejudice (n.)

c. 1300, "despite, contempt," from Old French prejudice "a prejudice, prejudgment; damage" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin prejudicium "injustice," from Latin praeiudicium "prior judgment, judicial examination before trial; damage, harm," from prae- "before" (see pre-) + iudicium "judgment," from iudex (genitive iudicis) "a judge" (see judge (n.)).

Meaning "injury, physical harm" is mid-14c., as is the legal sense of "detriment or damage caused by the violation of a legal right." Meaning "preconceived opinion" (especially but not necessarily unfavorable) is from late 14c. in English; now usually "decision formed without due examination of the facts or arguments necessary to a just and impartial decision." To terminate with extreme prejudice "kill" is by 1972, said to be CIA jargon.

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abort (v.)
Origin and meaning of abort

1570s, "to miscarry in giving birth," from Latin abortus, past participle of aboriri "to miscarry, be aborted, fail, disappear, pass away," a compound word used in Latin for deaths, miscarriages, sunsets, etc., which according to OED is from ab, here as "amiss" (see ab-), + stem of oriri "appear, be born, arise," from PIE *heri- "to rise" (see origin). [Watkins, contra de Vaan, etc., derives the second element from a suffixed form of PIE root *er- (1) "move, set in motion."]

The English word is attested from 1610s as "to deliberately terminate" anything (intransitive), but especially a pregnancy in a human or animal. Intransitive use in aeronautics and space-flight is by 1946. Transitive meaning "to cause (a woman) to miscarry" is recorded by 1916; with the fetus or pregnancy as the object of the action, by 1966. Related: Aborted; aborting. The Latin verb for "produce an abortion" was abigo, literally "to drive away."

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