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33 entries found.
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tent (v.)
"to camp in a tent," 1856, from tent (n.). Earlier "to pitch a tent" (1550s). Related: Tented; tenting.
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tent (n.)
c. 1300, "portable shelter of skins or coarse cloth stretched over poles," from Old French tente "tent, hanging, tapestry" (12c.), from Medieval Latin tenta "a tent," literally "something stretched out," noun use of fem. singular of Latin tentus "stretched," variant past participle of tendere "to stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." The notion is of "stretching" hides over a framework. Tent caterpillar first recorded 1854, so called from the tent-like silken webs in which they live gregariously.
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big-tent (adj.)
in reference to welcoming all sorts and not being ideologically or theologically narrow, American English, 1982 with reference to religion, by 1987 with reference to politics.
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*ten- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to stretch," with derivatives meaning "something stretched, a string; thin."

It forms all or part of: abstain; abstention; abstinence; abstinent; atelectasis; attend; attenuate; attenuation; baritone; catatonia; catatonic; contain; contend; continue; detain; detente; detention; diatonic; distend; entertain; extend; extenuate; hypotenuse; hypotonia; intend; intone (v.1) "to sing, chant;" isotonic; lieutenant; locum-tenens; maintain; monotony; neoteny; obtain; ostensible; peritoneum; pertain; pertinacious; portend; pretend; rein; retain; retinue; sitar; subtend; sustain; tantra; telangiectasia; temple (n.1) "building for worship;" temple (n.2) "flattened area on either side of the forehead;" temporal; tenable; tenacious; tenacity; tenant; tend (v.1) "to incline, to move in a certain direction;" tendency; tender (adj.) "soft, easily injured;" tender (v.) "to offer formally;" tendon; tendril; tenement; tenesmus; tenet; tennis; tenon; tenor; tense (adj.) "stretched tight;" tensile; tension; tensor; tent (n.) "portable shelter;" tenterhooks; tenuous; tenure; tetanus; thin; tone; tonic.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit tantram "loom," tanoti "stretches, lasts," tanuh "thin," literally "stretched out;" Persian tar "string;" Lithuanian tankus "compact," i.e. "tightened;" Greek teinein "to stretch," tasis "a stretching, tension," tenos "sinew," tetanos "stiff, rigid," tonos "string," hence "sound, pitch;" Latin tenere "to hold, grasp, keep, have possession, maintain," tendere "to stretch," tenuis "thin, rare, fine;" Old Church Slavonic tento "cord;" Old English þynne "thin."
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tenter (n.)
c. 1300, "wooden framework for stretching cloth," of uncertain origin, probably via Old French (but the evolution of the ending is obscure), and ultimately from Latin tentorium "tent made of stretched skins," from tentus "stretched," variant past participle of tendere "to stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."
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contubernal (n.)

"one who occupies the same tent," 1842, from Latin contubernalis "tent-companion, comrade," noun use of adjective, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + taberna "hut, tent" (see tavern).

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pavilion (n.)

early 13c., paviloun, "large, stately tent raised on posts and used as a movable habitation," from Old French paveillon "large tent; butterfly" (12c.), from Latin papilionem (nominative papilio) "butterfly, moth," in Medieval Latin "tent" (see papillon); the type of tent was so called on its resemblance to wings. Meaning "open building in a park, etc., used for shelter or entertainment" is attested from 1680s. Sense of "small or moderate-sized building, isolated but dependent on a larger or principal building" (as in a hospital) is by 1858.

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pup (n.)

1760, "young dog," shortened form of puppy (q.v.). Used earlier (from 1580s) for "conceited person," from the figurative sense of puppy. An English-Latin wordbook from late 15c. for Latin pupa gives English pup-bairn. Applied to the young of the fur seal from 1815. Used for "inexperienced person" by 1890.

Pup tent (also dog tent) as a type of small tent used in the military is from 1863. Sopwith pup, popular name of the Sopwith Scout Tractor airplane, is from 1917.

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proscenium (n.)

c. 1600, "stage of an ancient theater," from Latin proscaenium, from Greek proskēnion "the space in front of the scenery," also "entrance of a tent," from pro "in front, before" (see pro-) + skēnē "stage, tent, booth" (see scene). Modern sense of "space between the curtain and the orchestra" (often including the curtain and its framework) is attested from 1807. Hence, figuratively, "foreground, front" (1640s).

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chador (n.)

"cloth worn as a shawl by women in Iran," 1884, from Persian chadar "tent, mantle, scarf, veil, sheet, table-cloth."

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