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tension (n.)

1530s, "a stretched condition," from French tension (16c.) or directly from Latin tensionem (nominative tensio) "a stretching" (in Medieval Latin "a struggle, contest"), noun of state from tensus, past participle of tendere "to stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." The sense of "nervous strain" is first recorded 1763. The meaning "stress along lines of electromotive force" (as in high-tension wires) is recorded from 1785.

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hypertension (n.)
also hyper-tension, 1863, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + tension. Originally in medical use; of emotions or nerves, from 1936.
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*ten- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to stretch," with derivatives meaning "something stretched, a string; thin."

It forms all or part of: abstain; abstention; abstinence; abstinent; atelectasis; attend; attenuate; attenuation; baritone; catatonia; catatonic; contain; contend; continue; detain; detente; detention; diatonic; distend; entertain; extend; extenuate; hypotenuse; hypotonia; intend; intone (v.1) "to sing, chant;" isotonic; lieutenant; locum-tenens; maintain; monotony; neoteny; obtain; ostensible; peritoneum; pertain; pertinacious; portend; pretend; rein; retain; retinue; sitar; subtend; sustain; tantra; telangiectasia; temple (n.1) "building for worship;" temple (n.2) "flattened area on either side of the forehead;" temporal; tenable; tenacious; tenacity; tenant; tend (v.1) "to incline, to move in a certain direction;" tendency; tender (adj.) "soft, easily injured;" tender (v.) "to offer formally;" tendon; tendril; tenement; tenesmus; tenet; tennis; tenon; tenor; tense (adj.) "stretched tight;" tensile; tension; tensor; tent (n.) "portable shelter;" tenterhooks; tenuous; tenure; tetanus; thin; tone; tonic.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit tantram "loom," tanoti "stretches, lasts," tanuh "thin," literally "stretched out;" Persian tar "string;" Lithuanian tankus "compact," i.e. "tightened;" Greek teinein "to stretch," tasis "a stretching, tension," tenos "sinew," tetanos "stiff, rigid," tonos "string," hence "sound, pitch;" Latin tenere "to hold, grasp, keep, have possession, maintain," tendere "to stretch," tenuis "thin, rare, fine;" Old Church Slavonic tento "cord;" Old English þynne "thin."
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hypotonic (adj.)
"having reduced tension or pressure," 1873, from hypo- + tonic.
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hypertonic (adj.)
"with excessive tension or tone," 1809, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + tonic. Related: Hypertonia; hypertonicity.
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drawn (adj.)

c. 1200, "pulled" (of a sword, etc.), from Old English dragen, past participle of draw (v.). Meaning "made thin by tension" is from early 15c.

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premenstrual (adj.)

also pre-menstrual, "preceding menstruation," 1865, from pre- "before" + menstrual. Premenstrual syndrome (1971) earlier was premenstrual tension (1928).

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reflexology (n.)

1927, as a psychological theory, from German reflexologie (1912); see reflex + -ology. As a foot massage technique for releasing nervous tension, recorded by 1976.

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tensile (adj.)
1620s, "stretchable," from Modern Latin tensilis "capable of being stretched," from Latin tensus, past participle of tendere "to stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Meaning "pertaining to tension" is from 1841.
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bronchiectasis (n.)
"dilation of the bronchial tubes," 1848, earlier in German, coined in Modern Latin from Greek bronkhia "the bronchial tubes" (see bronchia) + ektasis "a stretching out, extension, dilation," from ek (see ex-) + tasis "a stretching, tension, intensity" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").
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