Etymology
Advertisement
technology (n.)
Origin and meaning of technology

1610s, "a discourse or treatise on an art or the arts," from Greek tekhnologia "systematic treatment of an art, craft, or technique," originally referring to grammar, from tekhno-, combining form of tekhnē "art, skill, craft in work; method, system, an art, a system or method of making or doing," from PIE *teks-na- "craft" (of weaving or fabricating), from suffixed form of root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate." For ending, see -logy.

The meaning "study of mechanical and industrial arts" (Century Dictionary, 1895, gives as example "spinning, metal-working, or brewing") is recorded by 1859. High technology attested from 1964; short form high-tech is from 1972.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
technologist (n.)
"one versed in technology," 1803, from technology + -ist.
Related entries & more 
technological (adj.)
1620s, in reference to terminology, from technology + -ical. Meaning "of or relating to technology" from 1800. Related: Technologically.
Related entries & more 
biotechnology (n.)
also bio-technology, 1947, "use of machinery in relation to human needs;" from 1964 in sense of "use of biological processes in industrial production," from bio- + technology.
Related entries & more 
nanotechnology (n.)

loosely, "study and application of extremely small things" in many scientific fields, by 1974 (but not widely used before 1990s), from nano- + technology. Often applied to manipulation of individual atoms and molecules, and sometimes given a precise range (up to 100 nanometers), but the sense of nano- here seems best explained as "very small."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
techie (n.)
one well-versed in the latest technology, by 1984.
Related entries & more 
CinemaScope (n.)

1953, proprietary name for wide-screen movie technology; see cinema + scope (n.2).

Related entries & more 
MIT 

originally M.I.T., abbreviation of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, attested from 1892. The school was founded 1861.

Related entries & more 
microelectronics (n.)

"branch of technology concerned with microcircuits," by 1958, from micro- + electronics.

Related entries & more 
Jacquard (adj.)
in reference to a type of loom, 1841, from Joseph Marie Jacquard (1752-1834) of Lyons, inventor of new weaving technology c. 1800.
Related entries & more