Etymology
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talk (n.)
late 15c., "speech, discourse, conversation," from talk (v.). Meaning "informal lecture or address" is from 1859. Meaning "a subject of gossip" is from 1620s (in talk of the town). Talk show first recorded 1965; talk radio is from 1985.
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talk (v.)

c. 1200, talken, probably a diminutive or frequentative form related to Middle English tale "story," and ultimately from the same source as tale (q.v.), with rare English formative -k (compare hark from hear, stalk from steal, smirk from smile) and replacing that word as a verb. East Frisian has talken "to talk, chatter, whisper." Related: Talked; talking.

To talk (something) up "discuss in order to promote" is from 1722. To talk shop is from 1854. To talk turkey is from 1824, supposedly from an elaborate joke about a swindled Indian.

Phrase talking head is by 1966 in the jargon of television production, "an in-tight closeup of a human head talking on television." In reference to a person who habitually appears on television in talking-head shots (usually a news anchor), by 1970. The phrase is used earlier, in reference to the well-known magic trick (such as Señor Wences's talking head-in-the-box "Pedro" on the "Ed Sullivan Show"), and to actual talking heads in mythology around the world (Orpheus, Bran).

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double talk (n.)

"deliberately unintelligible speech," by 1938, from double (adj.) + talk (n.). Old English had a similar formation in twispræc "double speech, deceit, detraction." An analysis of Chinook jargon from 1913 lists mox wawa "a lie," literally "double talk."

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sweet-talk (v.)

Sweet-talk, 1935, from noun phrase; see sweet (adj.) + talk (n.). Earliest usages seem to refer to conversation between black and white in segregated U.S.

"I ain' gonna stay heah no longah. Don' nevah keer, ef I do git cotched—or die. Tha's bettah than to stay heah an' listen to Maw Haney sweet-talk the white folks, whilst they drives us clean to the grave. ..." [The Crisis, July 1935]

Latin had suaviloquens, literally "sweet-spoken."

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walkie-talkie (n.)
1939, popularized in World War II army slang, from walk (v.) + talk (v.).
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talking-to (n.)
"a reprimand," 1871, from euphemistic use of verbal phrase talk to (see talk (v.)).
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talkie (n.)
"motion picture with sound," 1913, from earlier talking picture (1908), from talk (v.).
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talky (adj.)
"loquacious," 1815, from talk (n.) + -y (2). Related: Talkiness.
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talkative (adj.)
early 15c.; see talk (v.) + -ative. An early hybrid word in English. Originally especially "boastful," but now considered less pejorative than loquacious or garrulous. Related: Talkatively; talkativeness.
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backtalk (n.)
also back-talk, "impertinent retort," 1833; see back (adv.) + talk (n.). Originally often used in literary attempts at Irish or Scottish idiom. To talk back "answer impudently or rudely" is from 1849.
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