Advertisement
4 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
talc (n.)

1580s, talke, from French talc (16c.), probably from Spanish talco and Medieval Latin talcus, also talcum "talc" (ealy 14c.), both from Arabic talq, from Persian talk "talc." "It was applied by the Arab and medieval writers to various transparent, translucent and shining minerals such as talc proper, mica, selenite, etc." [Flood]. Related: Talcoid; talcose; talcous.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
talcum (n.)
1550s, from Medieval Latin talcum, used for any of various shiny minerals. See talc. Talcum powder attested from 1871.
Related entries & more 
soapstone (n.)
type of talc, 1680s, from soap (n.) + stone (n.). So called because it is occasionally used for cleaning.
Related entries & more 
schist (n.)
type of layered metamorphic rock, 1795 (earlier schistus, c. 1600), from French schiste (16c.), from Latin schistos lapis "stone that splits easily" (Pliny), from Greek skhistos "divided, separated," from skhizein "to split" (from PIE root *skei- "to cut, split"). The rock splits easily in layers. Liddell & Scott say Greek skhistos lithos was "probably talc."
Related entries & more