Etymology
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tabula rasa (n.)

"the mind in its primary state," 1530s, from Latin tabula rasa, literally "scraped tablet," from which writing has been erased, thus ready to be written on again, from tabula (see table (n.)) + rasa, fem. past participle of radere "to scrape away, erase" (see raze (v.)). A loan-translation of Aristotle's pinakis agraphos, literally "unwritten tablet" ("De anima," 7.22).

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tabular (adj.)
"table-shaped," 1650s, from French tabulaire or directly from Latin tabularis "of a slab or tablet, of boards or planks," from tabula "slab" (see table (n.)). Meaning "arranged in a list or columns; ascertained or computed by means of tables" is from 1710.
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tabulate (v.)
"to put into form of a table, collect or arrange in columns," 1734, from Latin tabula (see table (n.)) + -ate (2). Earlier in the more literal Latin sense "lay a floor" (1650s). Related: Tabulated; tabulating.
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tabulation (n.)
"act or process of making tabular arrangements," 1803, noun of action from tabulate (v.). Latin tabulatio meant "a flooring over."
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tace 
"be silent!" Latin imperative of tacere "to be silent" (see tacit).
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tacet 
musical instruction, 1724, from Latin tacet "is silent," third person singular present indicative of tacere (see tacit).
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tacho- 
word-forming element meaning "speed," from Latinized form of Greek takho-, combining form of takhos "speed, swiftness, fleetness, velocity," related to takhys "swift," of unknown origin.
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tachometer (n.)
speed-measuring instrument, 1810, coined by inventor, Bryan Donkin, from tacho- "speed" + -meter. Related: Tachometry.
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tachy- 
word-forming element meaning "rapid, swift, fast," from Latinized combining form of Greek takhys "swift, rapid, hasty," related to takhos "speed, swiftness," of uncertain origin.
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