Etymology
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tasteless (adj.)
1590s, "unable to taste;" c. 1600, "uninteresting, insipid" (figurative); 1610s, "having no taste;" 1670s, "tactless;" from taste (n.) + -less. Related: Tastelessly; tastelessness.
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tasty (adj.)
1610s, "having agreeable flavor, palatable," from taste (n.) + -y (2); in late 18c. it also could mean "tasteful, elegant" (from the secondary sense of taste (n.)). Related: Tastiness.
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tat (v.)
1882, "to do tatting," back-formation from tatting.
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ta-ta 
also tata, "good-bye," familiar salutation in parting, 1823, a word first recorded as infant's speech. Abbreviation T.T.F.N., "ta-ta for now," popularized 1941 by BBC radio program "ITMA," where it was the characteristic parting of the cockney cleaning woman character Mrs. Mopp, voiced by Dorothy Summers.
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tatami (n.)
Japanese floor-mat, 1610s, from Japanese tatami.
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tater (n.)
1759, representing colloquial pronunciation of potato.
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tatter (n.)
c. 1400, tatrys (plural) "slashed garments," from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse töturr "rags, tatters, tattered garment," cognate with Old English tættec, tætteca "rag, tatter." Related: Tatters.
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tatterdemalion (n.)
"ragged child, person dressed in old clothes," c. 1600, probably from tatter (n.), with fantastic second element, but perhaps also suggested by Tartar, with a contemporary sense of "vagabond, gypsy."
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tattered (adj.)
mid-14c., tatrid, "clad in slashed garments," from tatter (n.) or its Scandinavian source.
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