Etymology
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Swahili 
name of a Bantu people inhabiting the coast of southeastern Africa, 1814, literally "coast-dwellers," from Arabic sawahil, plural of sahil "coast" + ethnic suffix -i.
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marimba (n.)

kind of deep-toned xylophone, originally in Africa, 1704, from an African language, probably from the Bantu group (compare Kimbundu and Swahili marimba, malimba, name of a xylophone-like instrument).

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bwana 
respectful or reverential form of address in East Africa, 1875, from Swahili.
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Uganda 
from Swahili u "land, country" + Ganda, indigenous people name, which is of unknown origin. Related: Ugandan.
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Malawi 

East African nation, independent under that name since 1964, from the name of an indigenous people. From 1907 to 1964 it was known as Nyasaland, from Lake Nyasa (now Lake Malawi), from the Swahili word for "lake."

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Kilimanjaro 

dormant volcano in Tanzania, it is the highest mountain in Africa. The name is of unknown origin; the first element appears to be Swahili kilima "(little) mountain," but even this is uncertain.  See J.A. Hutchinson, "The Meaning of Kilimanjaro," in Tanganyika Notes and Records, 1965.

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tote (v.)
"to carry," 1670s, of unknown origin; originally attested in Virginia, but OED discounts the popular theory of its origin in a West African language (such as Kikongo tota "pick up," Kimbundu tuta "carry, load," related to Swahili tuta "pile up, carry"). Related: Toted; toting. Tote bag is first recorded 1900.
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safari (n.)

1890 (attested from 1860 as a foreign word), "an expedition over country in East Africa lasting days or weeks," especially for hunting, from Swahili, "journey, expedition," from Arabic, literally "referring to a journey," from safar "journey" (which itself is attested in English as a foreign word from 1858). Used from 1920s of various articles of clothing suitable for safaris.

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brother-in-law (n.)
"brother of one's husband or wife," also "brother of one's sister's husband," c. 1300; also brother in law; see brother + in-law. In Arabic, Urdu, Swahili, etc., brother-in-law, when addressed to a male who is not a brother-in-law, is an extreme insult, with implications of "I slept with your sister."
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dengue (n.)

"febrile epidemic disease of the tropics," 1828, from West Indian Spanish dengue, from an African source, perhaps Swahili dinga "seizure, cramp," with form influenced by Spanish dengue "prudery" (perhaps because sufferers walk stiffly and erect due to the painful joints which characterize the disease). The disease is from East Africa and was introduced into the West Indies in 1827.

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