Etymology
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surname (n.)
c. 1300, "name, title, or epithet added to a person's name," from sur "above" (from Latin super-; see sur- (1)) + name (n.); modeled on Anglo-French surnoun "surname" (early 14c.), variant of Old French sornom, from sur "over" + nom "name." As "family name" from late 14c.

An Old English word for this was freonama, literally "free name." Meaning "family name" is first found late 14c. Hereditary surnames existed among Norman nobility in England in early 12c., among the common people they began to be used 13c., increasingly frequent until near universal by end of 14c. The process was later in the north of England than the south. The verb is attested from 1510s. Related: Surnamed.
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Cullen 

surname, c. 1300, in some uses it represents an Englishing of Cologne, the city in Germany. As a surname it can be this or from Cullen, Banffshire.

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Rogers 

also Rodgers, surname; see Roger.

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Donovan 

surname and masc. proper name, from Irish Donndubhan "dark brown."

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honer (n.)
1826, agent noun from hone (v.); early 13c. as a surname.
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lambkin (n.)
1570s, "little lamb" (mid-13c. as a surname), from lamb + diminutive suffix -kin.
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quilter (n.)

"maker of quilts," late 13c. (late 12c. as a surname); agent noun from quilt (v.).

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watcher (n.)
late 14c. (early 13c. as a surname), agent noun from watch (v.).
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miller (n.)

"one who grinds grain in a mill," mid-14c. (as a surname by early 14c.), agent noun from mill (v.1). In Middle English both with and without the -n-. The Old English word was mylnweard, literally "mill-keeper" (preserved in surname Millward, which is attested from late 13c.).

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maltster (n.)

"maker of or dealer in malt," early 14c. (late 13c. as a surname), from malt + -ster.

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