Etymology
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surname (n.)
c. 1300, "name, title, or epithet added to a person's name," from sur "above" (from Latin super-; see sur- (1)) + name (n.); modeled on Anglo-French surnoun "surname" (early 14c.), variant of Old French sornom, from sur "over" + nom "name." As "family name" from late 14c.

An Old English word for this was freonama, literally "free name." Meaning "family name" is first found late 14c. Hereditary surnames existed among Norman nobility in England in early 12c., among the common people they began to be used 13c., increasingly frequent until near universal by end of 14c. The process was later in the north of England than the south. The verb is attested from 1510s. Related: Surnamed.
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Clifford 

surname and later a masc. proper name, attested from 12c. as a surname, originally a place-name, "ford at the steep bank;" see cliff + ford (n.).

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Cullen 

surname, c. 1300, in some uses it represents an Englishing of Cologne, the city in Germany. As a surname it can be this or from Cullen, Banffshire.

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Rogers 

also Rodgers, surname; see Roger.

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Trevor 
surname, from Trevor, Denbeigh.
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Taylor 
surname, attested from late 12c., variant of tailor.
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Flaherty 
surname, Irish Flaithbheartach, literally "Bright-Ruler."
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Farrell 
Irish surname, from Irish Fearghail "man of valor."
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Rushmore 

surname attested from c. 1200, Russemere, from place names.

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Barnum 
surname taken as the type of excessive hype and promotion, by 1850s, from circus owner P.T. Barnum (1810-1891), described in OED as "a pushing American show-proprietor." The surname is from the place-name Barnham.
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