Etymology
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supernaturally (adv.)

c. 1500, "from God or Heaven," from supernatural (adj.) + -ly (2).

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lycanthrope (n.)

1620s in the classical sense "one who imagines himself to be a wolf and behaves as one;" 1825 in the modern sense "werewolf, human who supernaturally transforms into a wolf," from Modern Latin lycanthropus, from Greek lykanthropos "wolf-man" (see lycanthropy), and compare werewolf. Related: Lycanthropic.

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reveal (v.)

c. 1400, revelen, "disclose, divulge, make known (supernaturally or by divine agency, as religious truth)," from Old French reveler "reveal" (14c.), from Latin revelare "reveal, uncover, disclose," literally "unveil," from re- "back, again," here probably indicating "opposite of" or transition to an opposite state (see re-) + velare "to cover, veil," from velum "a veil" (see veil (n.)). Related: Revealed; revealer; revealing. Meaning "display, make clear or visible, expose to sight" is from c. 1500.

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stigma (n.)

1590s (earlier stigme, c. 1400), "mark made on skin by burning with a hot iron," from Latin stigma (plural stigmata), from Greek stigma (genitive stigmatos) "mark of a pointed instrument, puncture, tattoo-mark, brand," from root of stizein "to mark, tattoo," from PIE root *steig- "to stick; pointed" (see stick (v.)).

Figurative meaning "a mark of disgrace" in English is from 1610s. Stigmas "marks resembling the wounds on the body of Christ, appearing supernaturally on the bodies of the devout" is from 1630s; earlier stigmate (late 14c.), from Latin stigmata.

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