Etymology
Advertisement
dim sum (n.)

"Chinese cuisine prepared as bite-sized portions served in small steamer baskets or on small plates," 1948, from Cantonese tim sam (Chinese dianxin) "appetizer," said to mean literally "touch the heart." Ayto ("Diner's Dictionary") gives the elements as tim "dot" + sam "heart."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cogito ergo sum 

Latin phrase, literally "I think, therefore I am;" the starting point of Cartesian philosophy (see Cartesian), from cogito, first person singular present indicative active of cogitare "to think" (see cogitation) + ergo "therefore" (see ergo) + sum, first person singular present indicative of esse "to be" (from PIE root *es- "to be").

Related entries & more 
fieri facias (n.)
writ concerning a sum awarded in judgment (often requiring seizure and sale of property for debt), Latin, literally "cause it to be done, cause to be made," the first words of the writ, from Latin fieri "to be made, come into being" (see fiat). Second word from facere "to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
Related entries & more 
summa cum laude 
Latin, "with highest praise."
Related entries & more 
summum bonam (n.)
Latin, literally "highest good" (in ethics), from Cicero; see summit, bene-. Plural summa bona.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement